Category: Work

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

IBM 2021 Award Winners

Inaugural Regional Indigenous Business Award Winner: Murri’s on the Move Ltd

Transferring safe driving skills and education to Indigenous youth and disadvantaged sectors of the community at a subsidised cost.

I2I Award Winner: Jessie Lloyd Music Pty Ltd

Connecting Indigenous women musicians or Songwomen into the professional arts industry and opportunities.

Indigenous Digital Inventiveness Award: BuyingBlack, Jetzak Pty Ltd

An online portal for the Indigenous Business Sector, their supporters and customers, helping businesses enter the digital marketplace.

Indigenous Ingenuity Award: Pipeline Talent Pty Ltd

Ingeniously establishing itself to act as a corporate vehicle to address the social issue of executive employment of Indigenous Australians.

PwC Australia partnered with the MURRA Indigenous Business Program Master Class Program to lead their dedicated award category, the PwC Murra Boost Initiative, whereby the winner is paired with specialist skills and expertise of PwC Australia to the value of $30,000, to support a specific part of their business growth.

This year the PwC Murra Boost Initiative was Cedrent Enterprises, a vehicle hire company working across a number of communities but continuing to grow with increasing market demand.

33 Creative worked with our designers and social media strategists along with agency, Iscariot Media, to produce resources to support individuals and businesses to engage with Indigenous Business Month. The result was online engagement with Indigenous Business Month platforms that doubled during and in the lead up to October.  Everyone is really getting behind #IndigBizMonth and we were excited to spur the movement with design assets that allowed for allies to share their support amongst their networks, helping to promote Indigenous businesses to thrive and address the needs of our communities.

Media

33 Creative also facilitated numerous media interviews with Indigenous Business Month co-founders, as well as a number of individual Indigenous Businesses on platforms such as SBS/NITV, National Indigenous Radio Service, Welcome to Country and other broadcasters who continue to have a strong interest in sharing the good news stories during Indigenous Business Month.

The interest from media outlets continues to grow, with special mention to SBS NITV for their Indigenous business segment focus this year, as well as National Indigenous Radio and other outlets such as Torres Strait Islander Media Association who are all helping to fuel the conversations about the significance of powering the Indigenous economy.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

Video and Creative Production

To support the campaign, we produced several video products, including a 30-second television commercial and several videos for social media platforms. Video shoots took place at Hearing Australia centres located in Western Sydney and Cairns. We also coordinated a photoshoot with the campaign ambassadors and their children in Sydney, choosing a home setting to align most strongly with the community minded and family focused nature of the campaign.

The Impact

Increased awareness and prevention are at the heart of the HAPEE program. Delivered within a social and political landscape where communities were receiving higher than average amounts of health messaging due to COVID-19, it was vital we created materials and media discourse that cut through and made an impact about what continues to be an extremely important issue.

Overall, Hearing Australia enjoyed a significant increase in web traffic and the downloading of the newly developed HAPEE resources. Calls to their helpline also increased as a result of the media engagement.

HAPEE’s next phase will focus on partnering with Indigenous media outlets to gain deeper national traction, particularly across regional and remote communities, with a focus on access.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

We developed a range of information materials and resources to support the ABS community field officers in their community outreach and stakeholder engagement activities. This included a conversation guide, stakeholder toolkit, and a suite of case studies developed in partnership with community organisations that tell the story of how Census data has benefited local programs and services.

We also developed print, radio, digital, social and out of home advertising placement, prioritising Indigenous media outlets. Media partnerships were developed to enable new and innovative ways to distribute the resources to as many communities as possible.

The materials were visually engaging, applying the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander branding for the ABS, which centred around artwork developed by Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith and Torres Strait Islander artist Naseli Tamwoy. The resulting combined artwork tells the story of cultural connection to land and sea, sharing knowledge and data to improve the wellbeing of communities.

The brand was used across all materials, bringing a highly visual approach to delivering the Census information that supports community connection and storytelling.

Feedback from stakeholders was that the materials were very appealing and effective in engaging communities. Results from the campaign evaluation sample indicated high recognition and cut through of the assets to encourage Census participation.

2019 NAIDOC Ball and Awards

In 2019 we proudly handled event production for Indigenous Australia’s premier gala event, the National NAIDOC Ball and Awards Ceremony.

 

The National NAIDOC Ball and Awards Ceremony is an annual celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander achievement by individuals and communities. Each year, the National event is held by a host city, with a theme set by the National NAIDOC Committee, supported (then) by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 33 Creative is proud to have delivered the event from concept through to production, with a dedication to enhancing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suppliers throughout the event.

A pinnacle event on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander calendar, the approach we took to conceptually bringing the 2019 National NAIDOC Awards to life was one of pride and sophistication. From early design concepts we wanted to create an event that was warm, inviting and positive, showcasing the strength and success of our people, both for those in the room and those watching the live broadcast.

We drew inspiration from the artwork ‘Dhina’ by the wonderfully talented Lucy Simpson of Gaawaa Miyay, created to honour story and what has been, and celebrate what is yet to come. This artwork was reflected in stage theming, through to room dressing, the program and graphic animations on the backlit stage screens.

Our stage production included entertainment from Casey Donovan, Dan Sultan, Christine Anu, the Merindas and many more, supported by hosts Sean Choolburra and Elaine Crombie.

We worked closely with our client, their partners and event sponsors to deliver a live broadcast three course gala dinner event and show, enjoyed more than 1000 people.

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The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

The words

Knowing this campaign required a bolder, braver approach, we pitched a theme that responded directly to complacency and tokenism, with the words:

“More than a word. Reconciliation takes action.”

The aim was to encourage Australians to commit themselves to the movement, emphasising that reconciliation can only be achieved through meaningful reflection, dialogue and action.

Bringing the notion of reconciliation into tangibility, this year’s theme is about action. It takes sincere engagement and quantifiable action to truly begin to reconcile. It also takes truth telling. And listening.

The art

Responding to the client’s preference for a bright, bold visual approach, we worked closely with Warumungu/Wombaya artist, Jessica Johnson, who developed the incredible artwork for 2021. This was a highly collaborative process that allowed Jessica’s art to be integrated appropriately by our design team across various materials (including an animation) without losing its meaning or heart.

Jessica’s work for NRW2021 tells the story of the land and community sharing a united call for action on reconciliation.

“With their rainbow shaped souls the spirits ask for us to join and make reconciliation more than a word, take action” – Action by Jessica Johnson

The impact
The theme ‘More than a word. Reconciliation takes Action’, has been shared across a number of design assets including an animation which was broadcast nationally on TV and online.

About NRW
Each year, NRW takes place from the 27th March to 3rd June. These dates are significant in that they commemorate milestones for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

May 27th marks the anniversary of the 1967 referendum whereby Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were constitutionally recognised in the Census. June 3rd marks the 1992 date of the High Court’s decision to overturn the legal doctrine of terra nullius, which in spite of 65,000 years of Indigenous custodianship – defined the Australian continent as ‘uninhabited’. This event is often referred to as the ‘Mabo decision’ as it took place as a result of the work of Eddie Mabo, a Torres Strait Islander man whose campaign work and legacy remain instrumental to date.

So where to next?
National Reconciliation Australia have compiled 20 actions for reconciliation. Visit the official NRW 2021 site for more information.

Click here to watch the video, or visit here to download posters, social assets and other resources for NRW.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

We developed a range of information materials and resources to support the ABS community field officers in their community outreach and stakeholder engagement activities. This included a conversation guide, stakeholder toolkit, and a suite of case studies developed in partnership with community organisations that tell the story of how Census data has benefited local programs and services.

We also developed print, radio, digital, social and out of home advertising placement, prioritising Indigenous media outlets. Media partnerships were developed to enable new and innovative ways to distribute the resources to as many communities as possible.

The materials were visually engaging, applying the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander branding for the ABS, which centred around artwork developed by Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith and Torres Strait Islander artist Naseli Tamwoy. The resulting combined artwork tells the story of cultural connection to land and sea, sharing knowledge and data to improve the wellbeing of communities.

The brand was used across all materials, bringing a highly visual approach to delivering the Census information that supports community connection and storytelling.

Feedback from stakeholders was that the materials were very appealing and effective in engaging communities. Results from the campaign evaluation sample indicated high recognition and cut through of the assets to encourage Census participation.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

We developed a range of information materials and resources to support the ABS community field officers in their community outreach and stakeholder engagement activities. This included a conversation guide, stakeholder toolkit, and a suite of case studies developed in partnership with community organisations that tell the story of how Census data has benefited local programs and services.

We also developed print, radio, digital, social and out of home advertising placement, prioritising Indigenous media outlets. Media partnerships were developed to enable new and innovative ways to distribute the resources to as many communities as possible.

‘Walking Together’, 2022 (Acrylic on Canvas)

Josh tells the story of the artwork in his own words:

“Walking Together highlights the Foxtel Group’s commitment to walk alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for reconciliation. The concentric circle in the middle with the ‘U’ shapes surrounding it, is a traditional symbol representing a campsite, meeting place, sacred site or community. For this artwork, the meeting place is representative of the Foxtel Group. The chosen colours connect with our businesses: Foxtel, Kayo, BINGE, Fox Sports and Foxtel Media. The significance of a circle is that everyone is welcome, everyone has a place, and everyone is treated equally. The handprints symbolise teamwork, working hand in hand, and also individuality as no one’s handprint is the same. The footprints are a reminder of the journey and commitment of walking together in the hope of true reconciliation. The four orange patterns and lines in the background symbolise the flow of energy and connection – our connection to each other, connection to experience and our connection to mother earth.”

– Josh Sly

The RAP team at Foxtel engaged with the project and process wholeheartedly, trusting the team at 33 Creative to deliver a memorable project with storytelling at the heart of the creative process as well as the RAP’s design outcome.

The RAP was printed using PEFC accredited stock and distributed to all of Foxtel’s employees home addresses, reflecting the group’s integrative approach in committing to its objectives.