Category: Work

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

Video and Creative Production

To support the campaign, we produced several video products, including a 30-second television commercial and several videos for social media platforms. Video shoots took place at Hearing Australia centres located in Western Sydney and Cairns. We also coordinated a photoshoot with the campaign ambassadors and their children in Sydney, choosing a home setting to align most strongly with the community minded and family focused nature of the campaign.

The Impact

Increased awareness and prevention are at the heart of the HAPEE program. Delivered within a social and political landscape where communities were receiving higher than average amounts of health messaging due to COVID-19, it was vital we created materials and media discourse that cut through and made an impact about what continues to be an extremely important issue.

Overall, Hearing Australia enjoyed a significant increase in web traffic and the downloading of the newly developed HAPEE resources. Calls to their helpline also increased as a result of the media engagement.

HAPEE’s next phase will focus on partnering with Indigenous media outlets to gain deeper national traction, particularly across regional and remote communities, with a focus on access.

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

Focussing on young adult audiences, 33 Creative’s role was to workshop, develop the messaging and advertising strategy, and produce social assets, e-newsletters, video content, and print advertising material based on an existing look-and-feel which NAISDA supplied to us as part of the brief.

The produced content was short, sharp, and vibrant, and delivered primarily through paid and organic social media. The assets suite comprises materials that are bright, contemporary and cut-through. These materials were complemented by print and radio advertising (English / Yumpla Tok) media engagement and personal stories of current and former NAISDA artists to enhance the relatability and diversity of experiences that NAISDA supports.

 

The media campaign was successful, generating more than 24 stories across 15 outlets nationally. The 2022 auditions campaign also generated strong engagement via both paid advertising and organic social media content engagement, feeding into the college’s broader strategy of building brand awareness and reaching our communities both regionally, state-wide and nationally.

The brief

13 YARN provide 24/ 7 confidential, culturally safe crisis support. The First Nations led service connects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with trained crisis support workers to to yarn about your needs, worries or concerns without judgement.

33 were engaged by 13 YARN to enhance the reach and awareness of the service. We worked with the team to create a social campaign featuring diverse Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander influencers to promote the 13 YARN services to their audiences and enhance overall awareness in First Nations communities. We were excited to be working on this campaign being the first crisis support for First Nations people in Australia.

Creative approach

Our creative approach was purposeful and targeted to make sure we engaged talent that aligned with the known high users of the service, including age groups and cohorts of the community at highest risk of crisis situations.

Working with 11 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander influencers across Facebook, Instagram and TikTok, we created a brief that allowed our content creators to make content that was engaging and resonated with their individual audiences in an authentic and meaningful way. We wanted creators to feel empowered to talk to their audiences about mental health, and promote that there is a service out there specifically for mob to call during times of need.

 

Highlighting creators

BlackFitness

Josh from Black Fitness, a young Wiradjuri man, drew on his personal experience to create content that was both reflective of his own journey and lived experience sharing his own tips to look after your mental health and wellbeing.

Allira Potter

Working with proud Yorta-Yorta woman Allira, we were able to reach her audience of over 40,000 people to create a message that not only promoted the 13 YARN service but more broadly reduce stigma and shame associated with mob talking about their mental health.

If you or someone you know is experiencing crisis, visit 13 YARN or call 13 92 76, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

Paul Ramsay Foundation Brand Guidelines

Creative approach

We were pleased to be part of the program, bringing together the six partners to create a shared communications framework to share the impact of the projects individually and as a collective.

A key focus of the approach was elevating First Nations voices as leaders in education sovereignty to enhance the reach of projects and leaders.

The design approach also elevated the partner organisations in leading the work, supported by the Paul Ramsay Foundation. A partner pack was created to support a shared purpose, messaging and focus of the program wide communications, in conjunction with individual project communications lead by each organisation.

Paul Ramsay Foundation Partner Pack

The impact

The program announcement was a collaborative media release featuring each of the program partners and distributed to media nationally.

We worked with program partners and their agencies to support media pitching, supporting deeper coverage of the projects designed to promote Indigenous led education and influence more support for similar projects nationally.

We look forward to seeing the impact of the projects to support education outcomes!

Paul Ramsay Foundation Social Media Tiles

Tourism Australia engaged 33 Creative to write and produce twenty case studies that showcase First Nations people, organisations and communities that deliver content and initiatives promoting and celebrating First Nations-led cultural experiences as increasingly transforming the tourism sector.

Presented as a 42-page booklet, the Indigenous Cultural Storytellers Booklet is designed to act as a talking point when approaching international media outlets about potential coverage to support and celebrate Indigenous-led cultural experiences in tourism.

Working collaboratively, Tourism Australia oversaw the booklet layout design, while 33 Creative facilitated talent interviews, refined case study angles, and produced twenty written case study pieces ahead of the booklet’s final production phase.

Working within a short project timeline, 33 Creative quickly established a 5-person team of experienced First Nations writers, ensuring the talent engagement and interview process, as well as the written case study outcomes, were culturally appropriate, relevant and enriching.

The outcome is a beautifully presented and diverse collection of stories and insights from leading First Nations professionals spanning the arts, fashion, food and theatre realms.

Some of the talent whose stories are featured across the twenty case studies included Wesley Enoch (theatre, festivals), Franchesca Cubillo (Arts), Leah Flanagan (Indigenous music), Nornie Bero (Torres Strait Islander chef), Frances Rings (Bangarra – Dance) and Ben Graetz (World Pride).

Sharing language and culture with Gujaga Foundation

Established in 2019, the Gujaga Foundation is the peak organisation leading Dharawal language, cultural and research activities, led by and for the La Perouse Aboriginal community.

As a social enterprise, the community run organisation provides fee for service activities that support free language programs and cultural activities to be delivered back into the community, revitalising and preserving Dharawal language for future generations.

33 Creative were delighted to work with the Gujaga team to develop an overarching communications strategy to promote the work of the foundation in leading language, culture and research, build community engagement and support long term, meaningful relationships with its partners.

The final delivery of the strategy has been completed, to support internal teams in rollout.

To find out more about Gujaga visit www.gujaga.org.au or follow on Instagram for #dharawal language words and updates!

The brief

We were engaged by NSW Health to develop assets to promote oral health in the Aboriginal community. Our deliverables comprised of a poster, icons, videos, and an overall visual identity.

The approach

To kick off the project, we organised an onboarding workshop with our talented creatives. After laying down the groundwork, we reached out to the community for their input through a series of online consultations, where we tested our messaging and received invaluable feedback.

With this feedback in hand, we honed our creative approach and produced two insightful videos – one highlighting how to access dental services and the other providing education on daily oral hygiene. We also created a visually striking look and feel for the campaign, complete with key icons and a poster featuring images from our shoot, along with bespoke illustrations that supported our messaging.

The brief

We were engaged by NSW Health to develop assets to promote oral health in the Aboriginal community. Our deliverables comprised of a poster, icons, videos, and an overall visual identity.

The outcome is a beautifully presented and diverse collection of stories and insights from leading First Nations professionals spanning the arts, fashion, food and theatre realms.

Some of the talent whose stories are featured across the twenty case studies included Wesley Enoch (theatre, festivals), Franchesca Cubillo (Arts), Leah Flanagan (Indigenous music), Nornie Bero (Torres Strait Islander chef), Frances Rings (Bangarra – Dance) and Ben Graetz (World Pride).

The impact

33 Creative facilitated the combining of the artworks and worked in partnership with both artists along the way to ensure their story was as they intended.

The resulting, ‘Our Story. Our Future.’ was created by Wiradjuri, Wotjobaluk, Yuin and Gumbaynggirr artist Luke Penrith, and Maluililgal people, Badu Island artist Naseli Tamwoy.

The artwork celebrates Indigenous stories as highly visible for the benefit of future generations. It embraces the cultural importance of storytelling and information sharing, entwined with a focus on working together for a strong future for children, family and community.

The use of colours and inclusion of country, land and sea, rivers and desert, reflects the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures across the continent. Individual motifs are featured in icons to enhance visual representation of key concepts within the ABS work.

Using the finished artwork piece, 33 Creative further developed brand concepts as well as brand guidelines which showcased the brand’s application across a range of reference materials. The resulting brand has been implemented across the ABS work to engage First Nations communities, including in the 2021 National Census campaign.

Learn more about the final brand and artwork story here.

Focussing on young adult audiences, 33 Creative’s role was to workshop, develop the messaging and advertising strategy, and produce social assets, e-newsletters, video content, and print advertising material based on an existing look-and-feel which NAISDA supplied to us as part of the brief.

The produced content was short, sharp, and vibrant, and delivered primarily through paid and organic social media. The assets suite comprises materials that are bright, contemporary and cut-through. These materials were complemented by print and radio advertising (English / Yumpla Tok) media engagement and personal stories of current and former NAISDA artists to enhance the relatability and diversity of experiences that NAISDA supports.

 

The media campaign was successful, generating more than 24 stories across 15 outlets nationally. The 2022 auditions campaign also generated strong engagement via both paid advertising and organic social media content engagement, feeding into the college’s broader strategy of building brand awareness and reaching our communities both regionally, state-wide and nationally.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

The words

Knowing this campaign required a bolder, braver approach, we pitched a theme that responded directly to complacency and tokenism, with the words:

“More than a word. Reconciliation takes action.”

The aim was to encourage Australians to commit themselves to the movement, emphasising that reconciliation can only be achieved through meaningful reflection, dialogue and action.

Bringing the notion of reconciliation into tangibility, this year’s theme is about action. It takes sincere engagement and quantifiable action to truly begin to reconcile. It also takes truth telling. And listening.

The art

Responding to the client’s preference for a bright, bold visual approach, we worked closely with Warumungu/Wombaya artist, Jessica Johnson, who developed the incredible artwork for 2021. This was a highly collaborative process that allowed Jessica’s art to be integrated appropriately by our design team across various materials (including an animation) without losing its meaning or heart.

Jessica’s work for NRW2021 tells the story of the land and community sharing a united call for action on reconciliation.

“With their rainbow shaped souls the spirits ask for us to join and make reconciliation more than a word, take action” – Action by Jessica Johnson

The impact
The theme ‘More than a word. Reconciliation takes Action’, has been shared across a number of design assets including an animation which was broadcast nationally on TV and online.

About NRW
Each year, NRW takes place from the 27th March to 3rd June. These dates are significant in that they commemorate milestones for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

May 27th marks the anniversary of the 1967 referendum whereby Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were constitutionally recognised in the Census. June 3rd marks the 1992 date of the High Court’s decision to overturn the legal doctrine of terra nullius, which in spite of 65,000 years of Indigenous custodianship – defined the Australian continent as ‘uninhabited’. This event is often referred to as the ‘Mabo decision’ as it took place as a result of the work of Eddie Mabo, a Torres Strait Islander man whose campaign work and legacy remain instrumental to date.

So where to next?
National Reconciliation Australia have compiled 20 actions for reconciliation. Visit the official NRW 2021 site for more information.

Click here to watch the video, or visit here to download posters, social assets and other resources for NRW.