Category: Design

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

The brief

In 2021, Reconciliation Australia contracted us to lead the creative development of the theme for National Reconciliation Week.

Our client’s objective was to create campaign messaging and collateral that not only acknowledged the 20-year history of Reconciliation Australia and the reconciliation movement to date, but also challenged all Australians to do more, and work harder, to achieve the goals of the reconciliation movement.

The words

Knowing this campaign required a bolder, braver approach, we pitched a theme that responded directly to complacency and tokenism, with the words:

“More than a word. Reconciliation takes action.”

The aim was to encourage Australians to commit themselves to the movement, emphasising that reconciliation can only be achieved through meaningful reflection, dialogue and action.

Bringing the notion of reconciliation into tangibility, this year’s theme is about action. It takes sincere engagement and quantifiable action to truly begin to reconcile. It also takes truth telling. And listening.

The art

Responding to the client’s preference for a bright, bold visual approach, we worked closely with Warumungu/Wombaya artist, Jessica Johnson, who developed the incredible artwork for 2021. This was a highly collaborative process that allowed Jessica’s art to be integrated appropriately by our design team across various materials (including an animation) without losing its meaning or heart.

Jessica’s work for NRW2021 tells the story of the land and community sharing a united call for action on reconciliation.

“With their rainbow shaped souls the spirits ask for us to join and make reconciliation more than a word, take action” – Action by Jessica Johnson

The impact
The theme ‘More than a word. Reconciliation takes Action’, has been shared across a number of design assets including an animation which was broadcast nationally on TV and online.

About NRW
Each year, NRW takes place from the 27th March to 3rd June. These dates are significant in that they commemorate milestones for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

May 27th marks the anniversary of the 1967 referendum whereby Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were constitutionally recognised in the Census. June 3rd marks the 1992 date of the High Court’s decision to overturn the legal doctrine of terra nullius, which in spite of 65,000 years of Indigenous custodianship – defined the Australian continent as ‘uninhabited’. This event is often referred to as the ‘Mabo decision’ as it took place as a result of the work of Eddie Mabo, a Torres Strait Islander man whose campaign work and legacy remain instrumental to date.

So where to next?
National Reconciliation Australia have compiled 20 actions for reconciliation. Visit the official NRW 2021 site for more information.

Click here to watch the video, or visit here to download posters, social assets and other resources for NRW.

The brief

In 2021, Reconciliation Australia contracted us to lead the creative development of the theme for National Reconciliation Week.

Our client’s objective was to create campaign messaging and collateral that not only acknowledged the 20-year history of Reconciliation Australia and the reconciliation movement to date, but also challenged all Australians to do more, and work harder, to achieve the goals of the reconciliation movement.

The Jawun partnership model has been revitalised with a prospectus and welcome pack to support new and existing friends of Jawun in the continued journey of partnership. Twenty years on, Jawun continues to grow, to find new friends and partners to continue walking the path communities have lit.

In the words of the Kuku Yalanji language, the home and birthplace of Jawun in Cape York, the story continues.

Our people. Our future. Muruku (together). 

Testimonial from Karyn Baylis, former Jawun CEO

“Jawun means family / friend in the Kuku Yalanji language of Mossman Gorge and when I think of 33 Creative I think of them as members of that extended family.

Their ability to absorb who you are, where you are going and how you want to tell your story is quite extraordinary. They listen, watch and engage in a manner that makes you feel confident and open in your communications with them.

The product they deliver is always of the highest standard, with the story telling they incorporate to be exceptional.

Jawun has engaged 33 Creative on many occasions from event management support to creative design and to brochure production. I personally have such a level of confidence in what they will deliver as I see them on the briefings listen and then ask true quality questions. So you know they have informed themselves in the best possible manner in order to produce something that aligns with the organisations culture and aspirations for its partners and customers.

It is a pleasure to have 33 Creative as extended members of our Jawun family”.

– Karyn Baylis

Find out more about Jawun, and join the journey

The brief

In 2021, Reconciliation Australia contracted us to lead the creative development of the theme for National Reconciliation Week.

Our client’s objective was to create campaign messaging and collateral that not only acknowledged the 20-year history of Reconciliation Australia and the reconciliation movement to date, but also challenged all Australians to do more, and work harder, to achieve the goals of the reconciliation movement.

The Jawun partnership model has been revitalised with a prospectus and welcome pack to support new and existing friends of Jawun in the continued journey of partnership. Twenty years on, Jawun continues to grow, to find new friends and partners to continue walking the path communities have lit.

In the words of the Kuku Yalanji language, the home and birthplace of Jawun in Cape York, the story continues.

Our people. Our future. Muruku (together). 

‘Walking Together’, 2022 (Acrylic on Canvas)

Josh tells the story of the artwork in his own words:

“Walking Together highlights the Foxtel Group’s commitment to walk alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for reconciliation. The concentric circle in the middle with the ‘U’ shapes surrounding it, is a traditional symbol representing a campsite, meeting place, sacred site or community. For this artwork, the meeting place is representative of the Foxtel Group. The chosen colours connect with our businesses: Foxtel, Kayo, BINGE, Fox Sports and Foxtel Media. The significance of a circle is that everyone is welcome, everyone has a place, and everyone is treated equally. The handprints symbolise teamwork, working hand in hand, and also individuality as no one’s handprint is the same. The footprints are a reminder of the journey and commitment of walking together in the hope of true reconciliation. The four orange patterns and lines in the background symbolise the flow of energy and connection – our connection to each other, connection to experience and our connection to mother earth.”

– Josh Sly

The RAP team at Foxtel engaged with the project and process wholeheartedly, trusting the team at 33 Creative to deliver a memorable project with storytelling at the heart of the creative process as well as the RAP’s design outcome.

The RAP was printed using PEFC accredited stock and distributed to all of Foxtel’s employees home addresses, reflecting the group’s integrative approach in committing to its objectives.

The brief

In 2021, Reconciliation Australia contracted us to lead the creative development of the theme for National Reconciliation Week.

Our client’s objective was to create campaign messaging and collateral that not only acknowledged the 20-year history of Reconciliation Australia and the reconciliation movement to date, but also challenged all Australians to do more, and work harder, to achieve the goals of the reconciliation movement.

The Jawun partnership model has been revitalised with a prospectus and welcome pack to support new and existing friends of Jawun in the continued journey of partnership. Twenty years on, Jawun continues to grow, to find new friends and partners to continue walking the path communities have lit.

In the words of the Kuku Yalanji language, the home and birthplace of Jawun in Cape York, the story continues.

Our people. Our future. Muruku (together). 

‘Walking Together’, 2022 (Acrylic on Canvas)

Josh tells the story of the artwork in his own words:

“Walking Together highlights the Foxtel Group’s commitment to walk alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for reconciliation. The concentric circle in the middle with the ‘U’ shapes surrounding it, is a traditional symbol representing a campsite, meeting place, sacred site or community. For this artwork, the meeting place is representative of the Foxtel Group. The chosen colours connect with our businesses: Foxtel, Kayo, BINGE, Fox Sports and Foxtel Media. The significance of a circle is that everyone is welcome, everyone has a place, and everyone is treated equally. The handprints symbolise teamwork, working hand in hand, and also individuality as no one’s handprint is the same. The footprints are a reminder of the journey and commitment of walking together in the hope of true reconciliation. The four orange patterns and lines in the background symbolise the flow of energy and connection – our connection to each other, connection to experience and our connection to mother earth.”

– Josh Sly

Good Design Awards

In 2021, we were thrilled to learn that the AIATSIS website redevelopment was recognised at the Australian Good Design Awards, receiving a Gold Accolade in the Digital Design category.

The project was a true collaboration of skills and expertise, reflecting and celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and knowledge through a contemporary platform which continues to make an impact among its audiences.

The brief

In 2021, Reconciliation Australia contracted us to lead the creative development of the theme for National Reconciliation Week.

Our client’s objective was to create campaign messaging and collateral that not only acknowledged the 20-year history of Reconciliation Australia and the reconciliation movement to date, but also challenged all Australians to do more, and work harder, to achieve the goals of the reconciliation movement.

The materials

Our goal was to create a strength-based approach to empowering individuals, their families, and their communities in knowing they are not alone. To do this we created materials that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by eating disorders and body image issues could easily recognise and identify with.

The ‘Every BODY is Deadly campaign’ was launched with two key campaign ambassadors: Wiradjuri, Bundjulung, Kamilaroi and Yuin woman, Garigarra Mundine, and Kamilaroi and Dhungutti sister girl, Felicia Foxx, who shared their personal stories.

For Felicia Foxx, growing up in a male-dominated Aboriginal family that was very masculine and athletic had a significant impact on her body image and sexual identity. For years she struggled with expectations of how her body should look—until she realised it was just like her ancestors.

Back home with her family and surrounded by culture, Garra never took much notice of her body image. However, at the age of 11 after moving to Sydney, she began to feel her body was different and eventually developed an eating disorder.

Video Production

A major aspect of the communications campaign were videos produced specifically for social media platforms and audiences.

In the videos, Garra and Felicia talk openly about their personal journeys and body image related experiences.

The video shoot took place over the course of a single day in the inner-west Sydney suburb of Newtown, and also included a photoshoot with each talent.

We hired an indoor living space for interviews and interior shots, and acquired b-roll in surrounding suburban streets, as well as the iconic Carriageworks precinct (the former Eveleigh Railway Workshops).

Our crew on the day consisted of a videographer, producer, production assistant, and hair and makeup professional.

Pre-production work included location scouting and booking, the development of a videography brief, shot list, and run sheet for the day, the development of interview questions, and talent and crew booking.

The impact

The Every BODY is Deadly campaign is a first step, providing a platform for awareness and discussion about this issue.

The materials are available to download from the Butterfly Foundation website, to help support community health providers, schools, and staff to identify signs and symptoms of an eating disorder.

The vision for the campaign is to continue building out these personal stories, recognising and reflecting the diversity of communities and ensuring there is not one approach that suits everyone – eating disorders and body image issues can affect anyone, at any time.

Support is available for people at risk or experiencing an eating disorder by calling 1800 33 4673. You can also call the helpline if you are concerned about someone close to you or you can contact Butterfly Foundation by email or online chat.

The brief

In 2021, Reconciliation Australia contracted us to lead the creative development of the theme for National Reconciliation Week.

Our client’s objective was to create campaign messaging and collateral that not only acknowledged the 20-year history of Reconciliation Australia and the reconciliation movement to date, but also challenged all Australians to do more, and work harder, to achieve the goals of the reconciliation movement.

The impact

SWSB members adapted – as strong women in business do – to the new challenges brought about by COVID-19. The online SWSB Facebook group grew vastly into a flourishing interactive hub for likeminded women to support each other in life and in business through unprecedented times. The first half of 2021 saw the existing SWSB Facebook membership grow by 22 percent.

As part of the overall strategy, we worked with the SWSB team to analyse recurring themes and universal experiences SWSB members were contending with in the current COVID landscape, building this into the strategy.  A key deliverable was the development of SWSB’s first ever regular newsletter.

Now at 1,160 subscribers and growing strong, the newsletter provides another medium to tell stories and unite the SWSB community through rich, focused and user-generated content. Moreover, the ‘Women in Business’ section of the newsletter has consistently been one of the top four performing click links of each newsletter edition so far.

Other deliverables included the successful implementation of a social media risk management and moderation response guide, as well as the establishment of the SWSB Instagram community which is currently at 1.2K members and steadily growing.

Re-strategising and building on SWSB’s online community also meant that conversations and opportunities to network were made more accessible to Indigenous women in business in regional and remote areas – a key focus for SWSB.

‘Your Health is in Your Hands’ is a national project to raise awareness and boost the rates of MBS 715 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health checks among the patient and health practitioner communities. The project is aimed at increasing awareness and understanding of the benefit of health checks to lead to behaviour change, and overall, better health outcomes for our community.

We created a positive, empowering campaign approach that engages patients about the personal health benefits, while ensuring health practitioners are informed about the importance of culturally safe care. This was informed by research and concept testing with key target audiences.

‘Your Health is in Your Hands’ materials are highly visual and engaging, utilising Luke Penrith’s artwork, ‘Let’s Walk and Talk Out Bush’ telling the cultural importance of good health and wellbeing.

Our work on the campaign included the production of patient and health professional brochures, a community poster, a patient journey graphic for health workers, an animation informing people about the health check,  a two part podcast featuring Dr Ngaire Brown and video case study stories and social media assets.

Real stories were featured in video case studies highlighting the success and dedication of Aboriginal health services in delivering the 715 health check, reducing barriers to getting or undertaking a health check, by sharing real experiences.  

For implementation, we developed a stakeholder distribution strategy with targeted engagement and follow up with remote, regional and urban health providers and communities. Focused engagement on social media and through digital editorial is also used to continue momentum throughout the strategy implementation, including generating user contribution and content to engage target groups. 

We thank the communities and stakeholders that collaborated with us to refine these materials; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous health practitioners, including Royal College of General Practitioners and National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Help spread the word about the importance of a 715 health check.

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