Category: Campaigns

The brief

33 Creative have a long working relationship with the NSW Centre for Aboriginal Health and a combined passion for improving the health and wellbeing of communities.

We were engaged by the NSW Government to support the rollout of communications and engagement throughout the COVID-19 pandemic crisis management and subsequent vaccine rollout. This is a project close to our hearts, helping to keep mob informed and protected.

The approach

Working with the Centre for Aboriginal Health, the Department of Customer Service, NSW Aboriginal Affairs and Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC), we contributed to the development and continual refinement of a communications strategy, including developing tailored resources to better support engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and stakeholders in NSW. We have worked flexibly with the Centre for Aboriginal Health throughout the pandemic, responding to ever changing situation.

A key priority of our approach was ensuring community voices were leading and elevated throughout the content, maximising reach and trust quickly.

We engaged community champions to share their experiences and encourage COVID safe behaviours throughout the campaign, ensuring health messages were delivered by trusted community leaders and health workers.

Community champion videos were highly effective in engaging community and formed an integral part of the campaign. Regular stakeholder toolkits and eDMs were also made available for stakeholders (including Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and Local Health Districts) to share locally.

We produced a number of TVCs, press, outdoor, digital, social and radio advertisements throughout the campaign to promote ways to help keep our mob safe.

We also produced a music video collaboration, with Mi-Kaisha and Nooky, to encourage youth social distancing at the early stages of the pandemic. The video clip was featured on The Project and boosted through NITV and other community channels, and was a finalist in the NSW Health Awards.

Mi-Kaisha

The brief

33 Creative were engaged by the Department of Social Services to support the development and implementation of the Care and Support Workforce campaign for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander audiences.

The campaign aims to raise awareness of the employment opportunities in the care and support sector – specifically aged care, disability support and veterans’ care – among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander audiences.

Care Workforce social tiles

The campaign

In developing the campaign, we commissioned an artwork by artist and person with  disability, Wayne Connelly of Yarrabah, ‘One People, One Fire’.

The creative approach featured a series of community-based care and support workers and the people they support, who shared their unique experiences as part of the sector to motivate others to join the workforce. We highlighted positive stories of working in the sector, showcasing the benefits to both support workers and the people they support. The creative featured Aboriginal aged care worker Julie and aged care recipient Joyce, and Aboriginal disability support worker Clinton, who provides in-home support to Denise.

We produced a range of advertising executions supported by relevant and culturally appropriate materials and resources, including video and written case studies and social media graphics.

We also developed a range of information materials and resources to promote the care and support sector such as factsheets, posters and a stakeholder toolkit, which we activated through engagement with stakeholders such as employment and student networks.

The outcome

We worked with community-based and national organisations to distribute the resources across Australia, generating grassroots engagement and action.

We are proud of the campaign and would especially like to thank our campaign supporters who shared their stories to drive positive change.

R U OK? Stronger Together Campaign

Concerned about the high rates of suicide among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, R U OK? contracted 33 Creative to provide advice and develop a targeted, national communications campaign.

Working closely with the R U OK? Indigenous Advisory panel, we developed and produced culturally appropriate advertising materials, including assets for television, radio and digital. We also developed a style guide, templates and tools to help communities to start a conversation about mental health and suicide prevention.

We delivered media and social media strategies and hosted a media launch which was well attended and reported on national outlets. Followed up with targeted stakeholder engagement to continue momentum of the campaign and resources throughout the year and in the lead up to annual R U OK? Day activities, including social media assets and moderation guidelines for culturally safe conversations.

In producing the video assets, we worked with key ambassadors to share their story and personal struggle of tough times. This storytelling approach showed the community that it’s okay to talk about these issues, to break down stigma and encourage members of the community that together, we are stronger. The end result is highly engaging video and digital content delivered across multiple platforms.

Read our media release to learn more about the Stronger Together campaign.
R U OK? Campaign image featuring Steven Satour

The brief

33 Creative have a long working relationship with the NSW Centre for Aboriginal Health and a combined passion for improving the health and wellbeing of communities.

We were engaged by the NSW Government to support the rollout of communications and engagement throughout the COVID-19 pandemic crisis management and subsequent vaccine rollout. This is a project close to our hearts, helping to keep mob informed and protected.

Based on in-depth research that found adults often dismiss or ignore disrespectful attitudes and behaviours towards women and girls without realising it, the campaign aims to bring together families and communities to positively influence young people’s attitudes towards respectful relationships and gender equality.

We took a strengths-based approach to empower influencers of young people to role model positive relationships and take an active role in talking about respect and calling out disrespectful behaviours when they occur.

The creative approach utilised a series of community-based campaign supporters who shared their unique experiences as part of the campaign, to motivate others.

We produced a range of advertising executions supported by relevant and culturally appropriate materials and resources, including supporter stories, visual storybooks, posters, social media graphics, fact sheets and pamphlets, conversation guides, an excuse interpreter and a respect checklist.

We worked with community controlled and other organisations nationally to distribute the resources on the ground, generating grassroots engagement and action.

We are proud of the campaign and would especially like to thank our campaign supporters who shared their stories to drive positive change.

The approach

Working with the Centre for Aboriginal Health, the Department of Customer Service, NSW Aboriginal Affairs and Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC), we contributed to the development and continual refinement of a communications strategy, including developing tailored resources to better support engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and stakeholders in NSW. We have worked flexibly with the Centre for Aboriginal Health throughout the pandemic, responding to ever changing situation.

A key priority of our approach was ensuring community voices were leading and elevated throughout the content, maximising reach and trust quickly.

We engaged community champions to share their experiences and encourage COVID safe behaviours throughout the campaign, ensuring health messages were delivered by trusted community leaders and health workers.

Community champion videos were highly effective in engaging community and formed an integral part of the campaign. Regular stakeholder toolkits and eDMs were also made available for stakeholders (including Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and Local Health Districts) to share locally.

We produced a number of TVCs, press, outdoor, digital, social and radio advertisements throughout the campaign to promote ways to help keep our mob safe.

We also produced a music video collaboration, with Mi-Kaisha and Nooky, to encourage youth social distancing at the early stages of the pandemic. The video clip was featured on The Project and boosted through NITV and other community channels, and was a finalist in the NSW Health Awards.

Mi-Kaisha

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