Category: Campaigns

Stay Healthy and Strong

The brief

33 Creative were engaged by the Department of Health & Aged Care and Cancer Council Australia to deliver the national bowel cancer screening campaign for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Bowel cancer is one of the most common cancers impacting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. If detected early, almost all bowel cancers are treatable, however only 1 in 3 eligible Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are completing bowel cancer screening. Increasing screening rates will save lives.

Stay Healthy and Strong is a multi-year, integrated campaign that is aiming to create culturally safe dialogue to encourage more participants to screen and stay strong. The first year focused on raising national awareness, with 2023 activity focused on regional activation to target regional and remote communities who are in hot zones and have a shorter completion period due to hot weather.

Gubbi Gubbi Doctor, Dr Joel Wenitong

The approach

Informed by developmental research, the campaign was designed as a multiyear approach to raise awareness and education to lead to positive behaviours and increased screening.

The first year of the campaign commenced in July 2022 with an on-air period of 7 weeks, supported by two additional bursts of media, PR and stakeholder engagement through trusted community networks. The campaign creative features Gubbi Gubbi Doctor, Joel Wenitong. Featuring a trusted health professional aimed to break down barriers, reduce shame and reinforce the importance of staying healthy and strong to spend time with family.

Building on this approach in 2023, the campaign focused on enhancing reach to hot zone areas, where the only period of screening is over winter months from April – July. Many of these northern communities are also in remote areas.

The 2023 campaign commenced in April with a targeted hot zone stakeholder focus, airing in 12 regional markets across SBS/NITV and 25 local regional and remote First Nations community publications from May. The paid media strategy utilised tailored hot zone creative featuring Waanya Gangalidda and Erub man Trevor Tim through channels into remote and regional communities, with placement of the Dr Joel creative in tandem for all other states.

Stay Healthy and Strong, National Bowel Cancer Campaign ambassador, Waanyi, Gangalidda and Erub man, Trevor Tim. Stay Healthy and Strong, National Bowel Cancer Campaign assets

A new instructional video was also developed to support health professionals in face-to-face engagement with community groups. This responded to community feedback that understanding how the kits work resulted in a stronger likeliness to complete the screening test, by breaking down fear of the unknown.

All content is also available via the National Bowel Cancer Screening channel on IndigiTube, hosted by First Nations Media Australia.

Artwork graphics and icons featured through the campaign are by Ngarrindjeri man Jordan Lovegrove.

Stay Healthy and Strong, National Bowel Cancer Campaign ambassador, Gamilaraay woman, Aunty Lucy Allan.

The impact

Early results from the campaign show the strengths-based approach is driving positive change, and momentum within the community is growing.

In 2022:

  • 1 in 4 people reported campaign recall
  • 1 in 3 people reported discussing the campaign with others

So far in 2023, we have achieved:

  • 92% increase in website visits from 2022-2023
  • 95% increase in resource downloads from 2022-2023
  • NITV program integration with Over the Black Dot reached 167,231 with more than 385,340 impressions

Future campaigns aim to build on this foundation work and further encourage conversations around bowel cancer screening, using a strengths based positive approach.

We’d like to thank our campaign talent and spokespeople, for sharing their personal experiences to break down stigma and encourage others in the community to stay healthy and strong.

  • Dr Joel Wenitong (Gubbi Gubbi)
  • John Paul Janke (Wuthathi, Meriam)
  • Trevor Tim (Waanya, Gangalidda, Erub)
  • Simone Jordan (Wiradjuri)
  • Aunty Lucy Allan (Gamilaraay)
  • Renee Bani (Kaanju and Wagadagam)
  • Russell Jeffrey (Woolwanga)
  • Jill Gallagher (Gunditjmarra)
  • Uncle Moogy (Ngarrindjeri Aboriginal Elder)

We were pleased this campaign was recognised with the First Nations Media Australia Award for Best 2023 Campaign. It was also shortlisted in the 2023 B&T Awards for Best Regional Media Campaign!

The brief

33 Creative have been working with Aboriginal Employment Strategy since our inception! We were delighted to be approached to help support the AES in developing their 25th anniversary strategy and supporting brand activation – We Deadly Together.

Statement of Impact

Creative approach

We wanted to create a yearlong celebration of events and activities, that tell the story of the AES, it’s people and community.

The program commenced in Moree, regional NSW in 1997, to address high unemployment of youth in the region. 25 years later, AES is now the longest running Aboriginal employment service, with a national reach and more than 13 regional offices.

The creative approach was designed to celebrate community and the people that have been a part of the AES journey over the last 25 years. We want to celebrate the strength, resilience and determination that helps AES deliver its vision – a career opportunity for every Indigenous Australian.

AES 25th Birthday Social Tiles

The impact

We developed a fun celebratory brand ‘We Deadly Together’ to support the AES collateral and activities throughout 2022 and rolling out the communications strategy for the year, including a partnership with the NRL Indigenous All Stars, establishment of a newsletter and social media calendar and a promoting success stories in the community.

We also worked with the AES team to share their story of impact to grow their reach and partners as part of the long-term growth of the organisation.

We wish the AES all the best in their next 25 years!

AES Banner

The brief

Cancer Australia engaged 33 Creative to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer, with resources development and copywriting, electronic newsletter distribution and media and stakeholder engagement around the launch.

Our Mob and Cancer is a website that provides culturally appropriate cancer information, resources and guidance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by cancer.

To support co-design of the site from its earliest development, Cancer Australia brought together an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Expert Reference Group to provide expert advice and guidance on all stages of the website development and release.

Our Mob and Cancer Posters

Creative approach

We wanted to create a suite of resources that could be shared online, distributed in health clinics or shared through health stakeholder networks. We developed posters, social tiles, digital newsletters, and a stakeholder toolkit to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer.

The resources feature artwork by Riki Salam, an artist and graphic designer and the digital designer of the Our Mob and Cancer website. Born and raised in Cairns on Yidindji land, Riki has connections to Muralag, Kala Lagaw Ya, Meriam Mer, Kuku Yalanji peoples on his father’s side and the Ngai Tahu people in the South Island of NZ on his mother’s side.

As of early 2023, community resources for Our Mob and Cancer have been rolled out and we look forward to seeing the continued growth of this important project!

Our Mob and Cancer feature artwork by Riki Salam Our Mob and Cancer social tiles

The brief

Cancer Australia engaged 33 Creative to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer, with resources development and copywriting, electronic newsletter distribution and media and stakeholder engagement around the launch. Our Mob and Cancer is a website that provides culturally appropriate cancer information, resources and guidance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by cancer. To support co-design of the site from its earliest development, Cancer Australia brought together an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Expert Reference Group to provide expert advice and guidance on all stages of the website development and release.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

Our Mob and Cancer Posters

Creative approach

We wanted to create a suite of resources that could be shared online, distributed in health clinics or shared through health stakeholder networks. We developed posters, social tiles, digital newsletters, and a stakeholder toolkit to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer.

The resources feature artwork by Riki Salam, an artist and graphic designer and the digital designer of the Our Mob and Cancer website. Born and raised in Cairns on Yidindji land, Riki has connections to Muralag, Kala Lagaw Ya, Meriam Mer, Kuku Yalanji peoples on his father’s side and the Ngai Tahu people in the South Island of NZ on his mother’s side.

As of early 2023, community resources for Our Mob and Cancer have been rolled out and we look forward to seeing the continued growth of this important project!

The Impact

Increased awareness and prevention are at the heart of the HAPEE program. Delivered within a social and political landscape where communities were receiving higher than average amounts of health messaging due to COVID-19, it was vital we created materials and media discourse that cut through and made an impact about what continues to be an extremely important issue.

Overall, Hearing Australia enjoyed a significant increase in web traffic and the downloading of the newly developed HAPEE resources. Calls to their helpline also increased as a result of the media engagement.

HAPEE’s next phase will focus on partnering with Indigenous media outlets to gain deeper national traction, particularly across regional and remote communities, with a focus on access.

Our Mob and Cancer feature artwork by Riki Salam Our Mob and Cancer social tiles

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

Our Mob and Cancer feature artwork by Riki Salam

Focussing on young adult audiences, 33 Creative’s role was to workshop, develop the messaging and advertising strategy, and produce social assets, e-newsletters, video content, and print advertising material based on an existing look-and-feel which NAISDA supplied to us as part of the brief.

The produced content was short, sharp, and vibrant, and delivered primarily through paid and organic social media. The assets suite comprises materials that are bright, contemporary and cut-through. These materials were complemented by print and radio advertising (English / Yumpla Tok) media engagement and personal stories of current and former NAISDA artists to enhance the relatability and diversity of experiences that NAISDA supports.

 

Statement of Impact

The media campaign was successful, generating more than 24 stories across 15 outlets nationally. The 2022 auditions campaign also generated strong engagement via both paid advertising and organic social media content engagement, feeding into the college’s broader strategy of building brand awareness and reaching our communities both regionally, state-wide and nationally.

AES Banner

Australian Bureau Statistics (ABS) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Brand Identity

The approach

33 Creative were engaged by the Australian Bureau Statistics (ABS) to develop an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander brand identity that aims to enrich the overall experience of First Nations people engaging with the ABS’s data and services.

33 Creative engaged two First Nations artists, developing the brief for creating a contemporary artwork that foregrounds Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cultures and experiences within Australia’s contemporary national story.

Each artist created an artwork that represented their culture and perspective on the ABS’s desire work more closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island communities to tell their story of people and communities.

The impact

33 Creative facilitated the combining of the artworks and worked in partnership with both artists along the way to ensure their story was as they intended.

The resulting, ‘Our Story. Our Future.’ was created by Wiradjuri, Wotjobaluk, Yuin and Gumbaynggirr artist Luke Penrith, and Maluililgal people, Badu Island artist Naseli Tamwoy.

The artwork celebrates Indigenous stories as highly visible for the benefit of future generations. It embraces the cultural importance of storytelling and information sharing, entwined with a focus on working together for a strong future for children, family and community.

The use of colours and inclusion of country, land and sea, rivers and desert, reflects the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures across the continent. Individual motifs are featured in icons to enhance visual representation of key concepts within the ABS work.

Using the finished artwork piece, 33 Creative further developed brand concepts as well as brand guidelines which showcased the brand’s application across a range of reference materials. The resulting brand has been implemented across the ABS work to engage First Nations communities, including in the 2021 National Census campaign.

Learn more about the final brand and artwork story here.

The brief

Cancer Australia engaged 33 Creative to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer, with resources development and copywriting, electronic newsletter distribution and media and stakeholder engagement around the launch. Our Mob and Cancer is a website that provides culturally appropriate cancer information, resources and guidance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by cancer. To support co-design of the site from its earliest development, Cancer Australia brought together an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Expert Reference Group to provide expert advice and guidance on all stages of the website development and release.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

We developed a range of information materials and resources to support the ABS community field officers in their community outreach and stakeholder engagement activities. This included a conversation guide, stakeholder toolkit, and a suite of case studies developed in partnership with community organisations that tell the story of how Census data has benefited local programs and services.

We also developed print, radio, digital, social and out of home advertising placement, prioritising Indigenous media outlets. Media partnerships were developed to enable new and innovative ways to distribute the resources to as many communities as possible.

The materials were visually engaging, applying the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander branding for the ABS, which centred around artwork developed by Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith and Torres Strait Islander artist Naseli Tamwoy. The resulting combined artwork tells the story of cultural connection to land and sea, sharing knowledge and data to improve the wellbeing of communities.

The brand was used across all materials, bringing a highly visual approach to delivering the Census information that supports community connection and storytelling.

Feedback from stakeholders was that the materials were very appealing and effective in engaging communities. Results from the campaign evaluation sample indicated high recognition and cut through of the assets to encourage Census participation.

The brief

Cancer Australia engaged 33 Creative to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer, with resources development and copywriting, electronic newsletter distribution and media and stakeholder engagement around the launch. Our Mob and Cancer is a website that provides culturally appropriate cancer information, resources and guidance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by cancer. To support co-design of the site from its earliest development, Cancer Australia brought together an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Expert Reference Group to provide expert advice and guidance on all stages of the website development and release.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

33 Creative worked between community and a designated steering committee to see that the communication and brand strategy was fit not only for the Premier’s priority, but most importantly, relevant and accessible to First Nations audiences – especially students, and their parents and carers.

Artwork by Kamilaroi Student, Felicity Adams

The Aboriginal artwork incorporated throughout the campaign was created by student, Felicity Adams, who is a proud descendant of the Kamilaroi people, currently living and learning on Dharug Country.

“This artwork is about the journey we take through school and our continuation to learn and grow. Each section represents our growth and understanding during our schooling until we are full of knowledge and prepared for the world beyond school. The four outside sections represent us continuously learning and trying to reach our full potential. For the middle section, I used dots in different colours, patterns, and sizes to represent all the knowledge we accumulate during school, including what we learn about ourselves and our culture. Our mix of knowledge and understanding is represented as a beautiful, intertwined piece of art.”

– Felicity Adams

Following the development of the communications strategy, 33 Creative’s Aboriginal internal design team worked with Felicity’s striking artwork, to develop a full suite of digital and print materials to support My Future, My Culture, My Way.  These assets were successfully rolled out, comprising informative fact sheets, social media assets, an infographic, and a comprehensive style guide and stakeholder toolkit to support the application of these campaign materials. Ahead of the My Future, My Culture, My Way launching, we also developed the campaign’s inaugural e-newsletter communications piece which cultivated high engagement from key community members and stakeholders.

As of early 2022, My Future, My Culture, My Way, has been successfully implemented and rolled out.

Click here to download the campaign resources or sign up here for My Future, My Culture, My Way newsletter updates.

Creative approach

We wanted to create a suite of resources that could be shared online, distributed in health clinics or shared through health stakeholder networks. We developed posters, social tiles, digital newsletters, and a stakeholder toolkit to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer.

The resources feature artwork by Riki Salam, an artist and graphic designer and the digital designer of the Our Mob and Cancer website. Born and raised in Cairns on Yidindji land, Riki has connections to Muralag, Kala Lagaw Ya, Meriam Mer, Kuku Yalanji peoples on his father’s side and the Ngai Tahu people in the South Island of NZ on his mother’s side.

As of early 2023, community resources for Our Mob and Cancer have been rolled out and we look forward to seeing the continued growth of this important project!

Our Mob and Cancer Posters

33 Creative facilitated the outreach of Indigenous influencers and managed the communication, briefing and development of content between the client and each influencer involved in both phase one and phase two. This involved researching and selecting suitable influencers with a platform that would best achieve the goals of the client. This resulted in a successful onboarding of 29 influencers including Bianca Hunt, Mitch Tambo, Casey Donovan and Rachael Sarra.

Each influencer provided creative content that engaged their audiences and raised awareness of the summit and the #BuyBlak Friday ecommerce event. We worked closely with Meta to provide creative guidance to each influencer ensuring their content was entertaining, engaging and/or informative.

33 Creative also produced the campaign’s broadcast suite, video content and social assets which supported all stages across the 8-week active campaign.

The Impact

Increased awareness and prevention are at the heart of the HAPEE program. Delivered within a social and political landscape where communities were receiving higher than average amounts of health messaging due to COVID-19, it was vital we created materials and media discourse that cut through and made an impact about what continues to be an extremely important issue.

Overall, Hearing Australia enjoyed a significant increase in web traffic and the downloading of the newly developed HAPEE resources. Calls to their helpline also increased as a result of the media engagement.

HAPEE’s next phase will focus on partnering with Indigenous media outlets to gain deeper national traction, particularly across regional and remote communities, with a focus on access.

Our Mob and Cancer feature artwork by Riki Salam

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

The outcome

Since the campaign was launched it has reach 6.2 million Australians and made over 9 million impressions. This is above the benchmark of 2-3 impressions to convert 1-2 for brand recall. There was a 5% measure of brand recall. The highest performing ad was the video with 6.2% brand recall.

The brief

Cancer Australia engaged 33 Creative to support the launch of Our Mob and Cancer, with resources development and copywriting, electronic newsletter distribution and media and stakeholder engagement around the launch. Our Mob and Cancer is a website that provides culturally appropriate cancer information, resources and guidance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by cancer. To support co-design of the site from its earliest development, Cancer Australia brought together an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Expert Reference Group to provide expert advice and guidance on all stages of the website development and release.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

The materials

Our goal was to create a strength-based approach to empowering individuals, their families, and their communities in knowing they are not alone. To do this we created materials that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by eating disorders and body image issues could easily recognise and identify with.

The ‘Every BODY is Deadly campaign’ was launched with two key campaign ambassadors: Wiradjuri, Bundjulung, Kamilaroi and Yuin woman, Garigarra Mundine, and Kamilaroi and Dhungutti sister girl, Felicia Foxx, who shared their personal stories.

For Felicia Foxx, growing up in a male-dominated Aboriginal family that was very masculine and athletic had a significant impact on her body image and sexual identity. For years she struggled with expectations of how her body should look—until she realised it was just like her ancestors.

Back home with her family and surrounded by culture, Garra never took much notice of her body image. However, at the age of 11 after moving to Sydney, she began to feel her body was different and eventually developed an eating disorder.

Video Production

A major aspect of the communications campaign were videos produced specifically for social media platforms and audiences.

In the videos, Garra and Felicia talk openly about their personal journeys and body image related experiences.

The video shoot took place over the course of a single day in the inner-west Sydney suburb of Newtown, and also included a photoshoot with each talent.

We hired an indoor living space for interviews and interior shots, and acquired b-roll in surrounding suburban streets, as well as the iconic Carriageworks precinct (the former Eveleigh Railway Workshops).

Our crew on the day consisted of a videographer, producer, production assistant, and hair and makeup professional.

Pre-production work included location scouting and booking, the development of a videography brief, shot list, and run sheet for the day, the development of interview questions, and talent and crew booking.

The impact

The Every BODY is Deadly campaign is a first step, providing a platform for awareness and discussion about this issue.

The materials are available to download from the Butterfly Foundation website, to help support community health providers, schools, and staff to identify signs and symptoms of an eating disorder.

The vision for the campaign is to continue building out these personal stories, recognising and reflecting the diversity of communities and ensuring there is not one approach that suits everyone – eating disorders and body image issues can affect anyone, at any time.

Support is available for people at risk or experiencing an eating disorder by calling 1800 33 4673. You can also call the helpline if you are concerned about someone close to you or you can contact Butterfly Foundation by email or online chat.