Category: Campaigns

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

Video and Creative Production

To support the campaign, we produced several video products, including a 30-second television commercial and several videos for social media platforms. Video shoots took place at Hearing Australia centres located in Western Sydney and Cairns. We also coordinated a photoshoot with the campaign ambassadors and their children in Sydney, choosing a home setting to align most strongly with the community minded and family focused nature of the campaign.

The Impact

Increased awareness and prevention are at the heart of the HAPEE program. Delivered within a social and political landscape where communities were receiving higher than average amounts of health messaging due to COVID-19, it was vital we created materials and media discourse that cut through and made an impact about what continues to be an extremely important issue.

Overall, Hearing Australia enjoyed a significant increase in web traffic and the downloading of the newly developed HAPEE resources. Calls to their helpline also increased as a result of the media engagement.

HAPEE’s next phase will focus on partnering with Indigenous media outlets to gain deeper national traction, particularly across regional and remote communities, with a focus on access.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

We developed a range of information materials and resources to support the ABS community field officers in their community outreach and stakeholder engagement activities. This included a conversation guide, stakeholder toolkit, and a suite of case studies developed in partnership with community organisations that tell the story of how Census data has benefited local programs and services.

We also developed print, radio, digital, social and out of home advertising placement, prioritising Indigenous media outlets. Media partnerships were developed to enable new and innovative ways to distribute the resources to as many communities as possible.

The materials were visually engaging, applying the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander branding for the ABS, which centred around artwork developed by Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith and Torres Strait Islander artist Naseli Tamwoy. The resulting combined artwork tells the story of cultural connection to land and sea, sharing knowledge and data to improve the wellbeing of communities.

The brand was used across all materials, bringing a highly visual approach to delivering the Census information that supports community connection and storytelling.

Feedback from stakeholders was that the materials were very appealing and effective in engaging communities. Results from the campaign evaluation sample indicated high recognition and cut through of the assets to encourage Census participation.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

33 Creative worked between community and a designated steering committee to see that the communication and brand strategy was fit not only for the Premier’s priority, but most importantly, relevant and accessible to First Nations audiences – especially students, and their parents and carers.

Artwork by Kamilaroi Student, Felicity Adams

The Aboriginal artwork incorporated throughout the campaign was created by student, Felicity Adams, who is a proud descendant of the Kamilaroi people, currently living and learning on Dharug Country.

“This artwork is about the journey we take through school and our continuation to learn and grow. Each section represents our growth and understanding during our schooling until we are full of knowledge and prepared for the world beyond school. The four outside sections represent us continuously learning and trying to reach our full potential. For the middle section, I used dots in different colours, patterns, and sizes to represent all the knowledge we accumulate during school, including what we learn about ourselves and our culture. Our mix of knowledge and understanding is represented as a beautiful, intertwined piece of art.”

– Felicity Adams

Following the development of the communications strategy, 33 Creative’s Aboriginal internal design team worked with Felicity’s striking artwork, to develop a full suite of digital and print materials to support My Future, My Culture, My Way.  These assets were successfully rolled out, comprising informative fact sheets, social media assets, an infographic, and a comprehensive style guide and stakeholder toolkit to support the application of these campaign materials. Ahead of the My Future, My Culture, My Way launching, we also developed the campaign’s inaugural e-newsletter communications piece which cultivated high engagement from key community members and stakeholders.

As of early 2022, My Future, My Culture, My Way, has been successfully implemented and rolled out.

Click here to download the campaign resources or sign up here for My Future, My Culture, My Way newsletter updates.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

The materials

Our goal was to create a strength-based approach to empowering individuals, their families, and their communities in knowing they are not alone. To do this we created materials that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by eating disorders and body image issues could easily recognise and identify with.

The ‘Every BODY is Deadly campaign’ was launched with two key campaign ambassadors: Wiradjuri, Bundjulung, Kamilaroi and Yuin woman, Garigarra Mundine, and Kamilaroi and Dhungutti sister girl, Felicia Foxx, who shared their personal stories.

For Felicia Foxx, growing up in a male-dominated Aboriginal family that was very masculine and athletic had a significant impact on her body image and sexual identity. For years she struggled with expectations of how her body should look—until she realised it was just like her ancestors.

Back home with her family and surrounded by culture, Garra never took much notice of her body image. However, at the age of 11 after moving to Sydney, she began to feel her body was different and eventually developed an eating disorder.

Video Production

A major aspect of the communications campaign were videos produced specifically for social media platforms and audiences.

In the videos, Garra and Felicia talk openly about their personal journeys and body image related experiences.

The video shoot took place over the course of a single day in the inner-west Sydney suburb of Newtown, and also included a photoshoot with each talent.

We hired an indoor living space for interviews and interior shots, and acquired b-roll in surrounding suburban streets, as well as the iconic Carriageworks precinct (the former Eveleigh Railway Workshops).

Our crew on the day consisted of a videographer, producer, production assistant, and hair and makeup professional.

Pre-production work included location scouting and booking, the development of a videography brief, shot list, and run sheet for the day, the development of interview questions, and talent and crew booking.

The impact

The Every BODY is Deadly campaign is a first step, providing a platform for awareness and discussion about this issue.

The materials are available to download from the Butterfly Foundation website, to help support community health providers, schools, and staff to identify signs and symptoms of an eating disorder.

The vision for the campaign is to continue building out these personal stories, recognising and reflecting the diversity of communities and ensuring there is not one approach that suits everyone – eating disorders and body image issues can affect anyone, at any time.

Support is available for people at risk or experiencing an eating disorder by calling 1800 33 4673. You can also call the helpline if you are concerned about someone close to you or you can contact Butterfly Foundation by email or online chat.

Stop it at the Start is a long term behaviour change campaign, a national initiative of the Council of Australian Governments to stop violence against women where it begins.

33 Creative was engaged across all three campaign phases to deliver the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander component of the ‘Stop it at Start’ campaign to reduce domestic and family violence and sexual assault.

Based on in-depth research that found adults often dismiss or ignore disrespectful attitudes and behaviours towards women and girls without realising it, the campaign aims to bring together families and communities to positively influence young people’s attitudes towards respectful relationships and gender equality.

We took a strengths-based approach to empower influencers of young people to role model positive relationships and take an active role in talking about respect and calling out disrespectful behaviours when they occur.

The creative approach utilised a series of community-based campaign supporters who shared their unique experiences as part of the campaign, to motivate others.

We produced a range of advertising executions supported by relevant and culturally appropriate materials and resources, including supporter stories, visual storybooks, posters, social media graphics, fact sheets and pamphlets, conversation guides, an excuse interpreter and a respect checklist.

We worked with community controlled and other organisations nationally to distribute the resources on the ground, generating grassroots engagement and action.

We are proud of the campaign and would especially like to thank our campaign supporters who shared their stories to drive positive change.

Evaluation of the third phase of the campaign indicated recognition was strong among Indigenous respondents with 76% reporting they saw at least one element. This result was higher than campaign recognition with mainstream audiences. Indigenous influencers were also more likely to take action as a result of the campaign, most commonly reporting trying to be more respectful of others and considering their responses to a young person behaving disrespectfully.

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