Category: News

2022 Naarm NAIDOC Awards acknowledged at Australian Event Awards

33 Creative were awarded the Victorian State Award for Best Cultural, Arts or Music Event at the Australian Event Awards and Symposium held on Darug Country on Wednesday 13 September, for the 2022 National NAIDOC Awards.

Production Team 2022 National NAIDOC Awards, Naarm

Accepting the award on behalf of the 33 Creative team, Director and Co-Founder Georgia Cordukes said the award was an honour for all of the stakeholders involved in bringing the event to life.

“We want to extend a big thank you to the Victorian NAIDOC Committee for allowing us to host the event on your Country. We also want to thank the National NAIDOC Committee, the National Indigenous Australians Agency, NITV and all the First Nations suppliers we engaged to put on the event for their collaborative spirit. Together, we created something extraordinary,” said Georgia.

Wiradjuri woman, Director and co-Founder Mayrah Sonter said the event was a labour of love, that brought the importance of culture and Blak excellence to the national and international stage.

“NAIDOC week is a highlight of our year. It is our time to celebrate our mob and our achievements and importantly, reconnected after a period of isolation during COVID-19 lockdowns. To have that celebration in Naarm, was really special,” said Mayrah.

“The National NAIDOC Awards isn’t just an event. It’s a celebration. It’s a testament to the power of collaboration, and we at 33 Creative are truly honoured to have been part of this journey.”

Full details of the event, including First Nations designers and suppliers engaged visit our project feature online.

John Paul Janke urges mob to screen regularly for bowel cancer

After turning 50, Wuthathi and Meriam man from Far North Queensland, John Paul Janke, did his first bowel cancer screening test using the free mailing kit sent to his home.

Having completed the test a couple of times since then, he is encouraging all mob over 50 to complete the simple screening test that can save your life.

“As Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, we need to have important conversations about our health,” says John Paul.

John Paul Janke urges mob to screen regularly for bowel cancer

“Bowel screening is something that is simple, free and easy to do. We need to encourage our brothers and sisters to participate, there’s absolutely no shame in looking after your health and wellbeing.”

Bowel cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people but with regular screening and if found early, nearly all bowel cancers can be successfully treated.

“There is no shame in doing the test and looking after yourself and your family,” says John Paul in the podcast. As a father of four boys, his health is an important part of being there for his family.

“As a Dad I want to be around for my family for years to come, to see my boys grow up and become young men. The test is simple, free and easy, and the outcome is huge – it can save your life,” says John Paul.

John Paul encourages people to have a yarn with their health professional if they have any concerns about bowel cancer screening and how to do the screening test.

“There is no time like the present. If you’re 50 or over, have a yarn to your local AMS or healthcare provider about doing the test, get on top of it early,” says John Paul.

All Australian’s aged 50-74 will receive the self-screening kit in the mail every two years. Replacement kits can be ordered through GPs or health clinics, or by calling the National Cancer Screening Register on 1800 627 701.

“There is no shame you mob – screen for bowel cancer today, you won’t regret it,” says John Paul.

John Paul Janke is host of NITV’s flagship program The Point, Presenter of ABC Radio Canberra and also contributes occasionally to The Project on Network Ten.

For more information about the benefits of bowel cancer screening visit www.indigenousbowelscreen.com.au.

John Paul Janke urges mob to screen regularly for bowel cancer

After turning 50, Wuthathi and Meriam man from Far North Queensland, John Paul Janke, did his first bowel cancer screening test using the free mailing kit sent to his home.

Having completed the test a couple of times since then, he is encouraging all mob over 50 to complete the simple screening test that can save your life.

“As Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, we need to have important conversations about our health,” says John Paul.

John Paul Janke urges mob to screen regularly for bowel cancer

“Bowel screening is something that is simple, free and easy to do. We need to encourage our brothers and sisters to participate, there’s absolutely no shame in looking after your health and wellbeing.”

Bowel cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people but with regular screening and if found early, nearly all bowel cancers can be successfully treated.

“There is no shame in doing the test and looking after yourself and your family,” says John Paul in the podcast. As a father of four boys, his health is an important part of being there for his family.

“As a Dad I want to be around for my family for years to come, to see my boys grow up and become young men. The test is simple, free and easy, and the outcome is huge – it can save your life,” says John Paul.

John Paul encourages people to have a yarn with their health professional if they have any concerns about bowel cancer screening and how to do the screening test.

“There is no time like the present. If you’re 50 or over, have a yarn to your local AMS or healthcare provider about doing the test, get on top of it early,” says John Paul.

All Australian’s aged 50-74 will receive the self-screening kit in the mail every two years. Replacement kits can be ordered through GPs or health clinics, or by calling the National Cancer Screening Register on 1800 627 701.

“There is no shame you mob – screen for bowel cancer today, you won’t regret it,” says John Paul.

John Paul Janke is host of NITV’s flagship program The Point, Presenter of ABC Radio Canberra and also contributes occasionally to The Project on Network Ten.

For more information about the benefits of bowel cancer screening visit www.indigenousbowelscreen.com.au.

“With this knowledge and experience, I can travel anywhere in Australia and get a job. It doesn’t matter if you’re my age or just starting out in the workforce, this job can take you places. I love that.

“It’s a great option for people who want to travel,” said Herman.

Herman believes that the sector could definitely benefit from more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people joining the aged care workforce.

“Here, in Broome, we have Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in care. It’s good to know they are in a safe place and getting the care they need.

“I would encourage people of any age to give this job a go. You will be supported every step of the way with training, mentoring and buddy shifts at first to get used to the role. There are three or four different shifts in most (workplaces) so the hours can be very flexible.

“Once you’ve got some experience, you have so many job opportunities wherever you want to go right across the country.

“I’ve been here for 12 years now. It must be good,” said Herman.

One of the reasons people work in aged care is the benefits it brings to both the residents and themselves. For Herman, he loves the connection and sense of mutual trust he has with the older people in his care.

“When you have a genuine connection with an older person they know, even if their eyesight or hearing is low, you come to them with an honest and open heart and they are happy to trust their care to you. That’s enormously rewarding and something that is missing from so many other jobs.”

For more information about how 33 Creative were engaged to support the development and implementation of the Care and Support Workforce campaign view our project overview here.
Hear from Herman on IndigiTube.
See more stories from the care and support sector or visit careandsupportjobs.gov.au for a life changing life and rewarding career.

Behind the scenes at the National NAIDOC Awards 2022

With NAIDOC fast approaching, we have been reminiscing on our time supporting the National NAIDOC Committee in producing the awards in Narrm in 2022.

We were so proud to celebrate all the Blak excellence and bring the community together for some of the first big celebrations post COVID. Producing, planning, scripting and revealing the National NAIDOC Awards in 2022 was a thrill for our entire team.

 

Join our team

First Nations Communications Strategist/Account Manager

We are seeking a First Nations Communications Strategist/ Account Manager to join our team.

33 Creative is a proudly Aboriginal owned media, communications and events agency that works to change hearts and minds, and empower communities, through storytelling and effective communications.

We are values driven. Our 33 values are Empathy, Collaboration, Integrity, Balance and Positivity and guide all that we do.

 

About us

We are a national, full services digital creative agency that supports our clients from strategy, content development including videography and photography, graphic design, animation, illustrations, community engagement and events.

Our head office is based on Gadigal Country in Sydney, with team members also working from Canberra, Brisbane, Cowra and the Central Coast. We work with a range of clients that share our values across government, non-government, non-profit and private/philanthropic industries.

About the role

Partnering across the agency, you will work on a number of projects and campaigns, including but not limited to national campaigns for government and non-government clients and local community led communications projects.

We are looking for a highly motivated communications professional that likes to be busy and work independently as part of a small but agile fast paced creative team. The role is diverse in its nature, with no one day expected to be the same. We strive to go above and beyond to meet our client’s needs, and importantly, make a measurable difference through effective and engaging communications activities.

Some of the things you will be doing in this role include:

  • Developing integrated communications strategies for our clients, including digital and social media strategy, focused on supporting First Nations communities. We are looking for new and innovative ways to solve complex communications challenges in consultation with the broader team.
  • Project management of campaigns including, development and implementation of advertising and public relations campaigns including copywriting of materials, input into creative executions, facilitation with the creative team to develop resources that fit the campaign objectives and dispatch and implementation of materials.
  • Build strong relationships – both internally with our team, as well as externally with our clients and broader First Nations and media sectors – collaborating and supporting each other in order to achieve successful project outcomes.
  • Content development: Developing engaging and informed content across projects and for platforms including but not limited to content printed materials (posters, flyers, brochures), website and social media content, eNewsletters and editorial articles, media releases and radio, animation or video scripts.
  • Public relations: support development and execution of public relations activities that support community and sector needs.
  • Participate in the research, writing and delivery of new business pitches and proposals.
  • Facilitate workshops and conduct stakeholder interviews.
  • Creative projects: participating in and supporting 33 Creative projects such as The Real podcasts and vodcasts and new projects.

Requirements

  • This is a First Nations identified position
  • At least 3 years’ experience working in a strategic communications role
  • A tertiary qualification in communications, public relations or related field desirable
  • Government experience desirable
  • Ability to conduct qualitative research and stakeholder engagement processes
  • Ability to develop and moderate client and agency workshops
  • Project and client management skills
  • Ability to build strong client relationships
  • Strong verbal, written and visual communication skills
  • Strong presentation deck development skills
  • Personal interest First Nations affairs

Don’t worry if you don’t tick every requirement on this list – we would still like to hear from you. We are a supportive work environment and are willing to grow with a talented and motivated individual who wants to learn and has a ‘can do’ attitude. We’re looking for someone who shares our 33 values and will fit with our wonderful 33 family.

To apply, please submit a cover letter, your resume and portfolio, including links to work you have produced via email to info@33creative.com.au

Victoria Achieves Treaty Milestone with Agreement Reached

Victorian Traditional Owners achieved a momentous milestone in October, with independent body the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria and the Victorian Government reaching an agreement on a framework for negotiating treaties across the state. 

Victoria will be the first jurisdiction to begin formal treaty negotiations which may begin as early as next year.

The First Peoples’ Assembly will negotiate an overarching framework, supported by $151.4 million in funding to help advance the treaty process, and $60.5 million for the set up of an independent treaty authority.

Looking Back

On the back of the long held land rights movement, ignited by many before this lifetime, in 2016 the Aboriginal Treaty Working Group was officially formed and the Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews announced the state government’s commitment to discussing Treaty.

In 2017, more than 30 First Nations community members formed its initial community assembly who went on to develop a series of detailed recommendations surrounding a future Aboriginal representative body. From here, the Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission was founded, with Aunty Jill Gallagher AO appointed as Victorian Advancement Commissioner. 

Through collective efforts, momentum gathered and 2018 saw a legal framework for Indigenous treaty negotiations to pass at state level, and the Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 2018 came into place. 

In 2019, an election occurred, allowing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Victoria and over the age of sixteen to elect representatives to the First People’s Assembly for Victoria. 11 people were formally appointed, with the first meeting taking place at Parliament House in December 2019.

What happens next?

According to the First Peoples’ Assembly, the next set of members will be elected in 2023 after the framework has been agreed on. Following the election formal state-wide negotiations will take place.

In July 2020, the Victorian government committed to a truth and justice commission and the Yoorrook Justice Commission was formed, aimed at establishing official public records of the lived experiences – both past and ongoing – of Aboriginal Victorians since invasion. The commission is expected to hand down findings of the records by mid-2024, which are set to inform Victoria’s Treaty negotiations.

For more information, to download a copy of the framework, or for official resources, visit www.firstpeoplesvic.org

NSW Schools Curriculum to Include Aboriginal Languages

On Monday 17th October, the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Minister for Education and Early Learning, released a statement announcing the official move to include Aboriginal languages into the NSW school syllabus.

NSW Students from years K-10 will be able to learn the Aboriginal language local to them under the new curriculum, with different streams available for students who already speak the local language or dialect.

The two streams will comprise the Language Revival pathway for students with no prior knowledge of Aboriginal languages, and a second stream, the First Language pathway for students who use language at home and in their community.

The announcement marks the first time the NSW Curriculum will aim to foster appropriate learning pathways for students already speaking Aboriginal languages.

Monday’s release stated, “The syllabus was developed following extensive consultation with Aboriginal communities and education stakeholders”.

“The syllabus includes guidance on how to involve Aboriginal communities when introducing and teaching the syllabus in schools, which research shows is vital to the sustainability of Aboriginal Languages programs.”

The new curriculum will be officially taught in 2024, allowing teachers the duration of 2023 to plan and get up to speed with the updated syllabus.

Some primary schools and pre-schools in Sydney are already running pilot programs in Dharug language, led by local traditional owners.

Year 11 and 12 students are expected to have Aboriginal languages in the curriculum by 2025.

For more information, visit the NSW Curriculum reform.

Victoria Achieves Treaty Milestone with Agreement Reached

Victorian Traditional Owners achieved a momentous milestone in October, with independent body the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria and the Victorian Government reaching an agreement on a framework for negotiating treaties across the state.  Victoria will be the first jurisdiction to begin formal treaty negotiations which may begin as early as next year. The First Peoples’ Assembly will negotiate an overarching framework, supported by $151.4 million in funding to help advance the treaty process, and $60.5 million for the set up of an independent treaty authority.

Image: Clark Webb, Executive Officer of Bularri Muurlay Nyanggan Aboriginal Corporation (BMNAC), with students.

Captured at the Gumbaynggirr Giingana Freedom School (GGFS) opening day, 2022. Image taken and supplied by BMNAC.

Behind the scenes at the National NAIDOC Awards 2022

With NAIDOC fast approaching, we have been reminiscing on our time supporting the National NAIDOC Committee in producing the awards in Narrm in 2022.

We were so proud to celebrate all the Blak excellence and bring the community together for some of the first big celebrations post COVID. Producing, planning, scripting and revealing the National NAIDOC Awards in 2022 was a thrill for our entire team.

 

“If you use one of these free tests, you are more likely to catch bowel cancer early,” says Jill.

Jill was aged 54 when she visited her GP about ongoing fatigue she was experiencing.

“I had just put the tiredness down to being overworked and juggling a lot in life and community,” Jill said.

Following a series of tests, Jill was diagnosed with Stage 4 bowel cancer, requiring two separate operations to remove a section of her bowel, part of her liver and other growths discovered on her diaphragm during surgery.

“It was very unexpected, and I was surprised,” admits Jill.

“I remember receiving papers at the hospital that included information about end-of-life treatment. I was not only shocked and confused, but also scared. I just didn’t know what it all meant,” Jill said.

Jill underwent another 6 months of chemotherapy before receiving good news from doctors – they believed they had removed the cancer. She was still required to undertake further monitoring procedures every two years for the ten years that followed.

Bowel cancer is Australia’s second biggest cancer killer and one of the most common cancers impacting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. If found early, over 90% of bowel cancers can be successfully treated.

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program provides free at-home test kits for people aged 50-74 years old, every 2 years.

Jill had no known family history of bowel cancer and had never completed a self-screening test.

“I have been lucky in many ways to have caught it and treated it. But at the same time, it brings me great sadness for other mob whose experience with cancer has not been as lucky. An experience of cancer to any extent weighs heavily on your mental health, and it really impacts the whole family,” said Jill.

Jill understands firsthand that there are often little to no signs or symptoms of bowel cancer.

“That’s why regular screening is so important. Bowel cancer affects everyone differently, and noticeable symptoms aren’t always present. The bowel cancer screening test kit can pick up pre-cancerous signs that help with early detection,” said Jill.

Had Jill have completed a self-test kit when she was first eligible at 50, her cancer would have been picked up earlier, when it was easier to treat.

“The test is nothing compared to what you could end up having to deal with. You can avoid needing a colostomy bag and you can avoid death if you get it early. And importantly, you can enjoy more time with family,” encourages Jill.

“It’s important we have conversations about preventing cancer, as a family, as a community, and without shame. It’s important to look after ourselves – we need to screen to stay healthy,” said Jill.

For more information about the benefits of bowel cancer screening visit www.indigenousbowelscreen.com.au.

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50-74 who want to order a new or replacement bowel screening kit, contact the National Cancer Screening Register by visiting www.ncsr.gov.au or call 1800 627 701. Health professionals can also order a kit on their patients’ behalf.

Image of Luke Carroll and Son with the book 'The Spirit of Sound'

Hearing health resources shine on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s day

New resources have been released to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander hearing health as part of Hearing Australia’s Hearing Assessment Program – Early Ears (HAPEE).

Hearing Australia has released a new video telling the story of the Spirit of Sound as part of ongoing efforts to improve the hearing health of First Nations children.

NSW Schools Curriculum to Include Aboriginal Languages

On Monday 17th October, the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Minister for Education and Early Learning, released a statement announcing the official move to include Aboriginal languages into the NSW school syllabus.

NSW Students from years K-10 will be able to learn the Aboriginal language local to them under the new curriculum, with different streams available for students who already speak the local language or dialect.

The two streams will comprise the Language Revival pathway for students with no prior knowledge of Aboriginal languages, and a second stream, the First Language pathway for students who use language at home and in their community.

The announcement marks the first time the NSW Curriculum will aim to foster appropriate learning pathways for students already speaking Aboriginal languages.

Monday’s release stated, “The syllabus was developed following extensive consultation with Aboriginal communities and education stakeholders”.

“The syllabus includes guidance on how to involve Aboriginal communities when introducing and teaching the syllabus in schools, which research shows is vital to the sustainability of Aboriginal Languages programs.”

The new curriculum will be officially taught in 2024, allowing teachers the duration of 2023 to plan and get up to speed with the updated syllabus.

Some primary schools and pre-schools in Sydney are already running pilot programs in Dharug language, led by local traditional owners.

Year 11 and 12 students are expected to have Aboriginal languages in the curriculum by 2025.

For more information, visit the NSW Curriculum reform.

The ‘Spirit of Sound’ Storybook is a collaboration with artist Davinder Hart, of the Noongar nation and is available in Children’s Day packs from SNAICC (Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care) and at Hearing Australia’s centres across the country. The Storybook has been distributed nationally to childcare centres, community organisations and Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations.

A series of community events kicked off across Australia in August 2022  with storybook sessions and opportunities to meet with Hearing Australia community engagement officers.

Wiradjuri man, father and actor Luke Carroll and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, mother and songwriter Emma Donovan, are encouraging community to make sure children have regular hearing checks before they start school.

“A regular check is so important before they start school. Hearing is so important, especially in the early years to listen and learn. From birth, my daughter has had regular appointments with Hearing Australia, who have helped us to understand her deafness and different ways of communicating,” said Emma.

“I’m very proud to work with Hearing Australia to highlight the importance of a regular hearing check for our kids,” said Emma.

Luke, who stars in the Spirit of Sound storybook video, says Children’s Day is an important time to highlight the benefits of hearing checks to help kids to be their best and dream big.

“Our kids are far more likely to be affected by hearing issues than non-Indigenous children and it can severely impact their ability to listen and learn. Under the HAPEE Program, regular hearing checks are free from Hearing Australia for all First Nations children aged 0-6 not yet attending full time school and they give them the very best start in life” said Luke.

Joining Luke and Emma are local First Nations community ambassadors, including Richard Tambling, Elsie Seriat in the Torres Strait and Daniella Borg in Perth.
Jabiru based former AFL player, father and descendant of the Uwynmil people, Richard Tambling reflects on the importance of hearing in culture.

“When we’re out bush on country, we need healthy ears, we need hearing to learn our old ways and for our knowledge and for our Elders to share their stories,” said Richard.
“Hearing Australia’s HAPEE program means hearing checks are free, safe and simple. I encourage everyone to get their kids a regular hearing check, from birth.”

Resources are available for parents and educators to support hearing health on the HAPEE website.

Behind the scenes at the National NAIDOC Awards 2022

With NAIDOC fast approaching, we have been reminiscing on our time supporting the National NAIDOC Committee in producing the awards in Narrm in 2022.

We were so proud to celebrate all the Blak excellence and bring the community together for some of the first big celebrations post COVID. Producing, planning, scripting and revealing the National NAIDOC Awards in 2022 was a thrill for our entire team.