Category: Work

The brief

33 Creative was delighted to join Jawun in helping celebrate their 20-year journey, acknowledging the achievements to date and setting the path for the next 20 years to come.

For more than 20 years, Jawun has been a place where corporate, government and philanthropic organisations come together with First Nations people to affect real change.

Starting in Cape York, partnerships are now in place in regions across the country, supporting communities on the ground through long term partnerships.

The program is proudly Indigenous-led, working with communities and corporate partners to deliver community benefits. While this is the driving purpose, there is also a practical reconciliation benefit to partners and secondees in their participation that contributes to a better nation.

Our strategic approach to thids project was motivated by the Jawun ethos of Indigenous-led empowerment, starting with the theme, ‘Our people, Our Future. Muruku’. ‘Muruku’ meaning ‘together’ in the traditional language of Kuku Yalanji people in Cape York.

In addition to the development of strategy, 33 Creative also produced a number of print materials which showcased the new look-and-feel for the 20th anniversary.

The Jawun partnership model has been revitalised with a prospectus and welcome pack to support new and existing friends of Jawun in the continued journey of partnership. Twenty years on, Jawun continues to grow, to find new friends and partners to continue walking the path communities have lit.

In the words of the Kuku Yalanji language, the home and birthplace of Jawun in Cape York, the story continues.

Our people. Our future. Muruku (together). 

Testimonial from Karyn Baylis, former Jawun CEO

“Jawun means family / friend in the Kuku Yalanji language of Mossman Gorge and when I think of 33 Creative I think of them as members of that extended family.

Their ability to absorb who you are, where you are going and how you want to tell your story is quite extraordinary. They listen, watch and engage in a manner that makes you feel confident and open in your communications with them.

The product they deliver is always of the highest standard, with the story telling they incorporate to be exceptional.

Jawun has engaged 33 Creative on many occasions from event management support to creative design and to brochure production. I personally have such a level of confidence in what they will deliver as I see them on the briefings listen and then ask true quality questions. So you know they have informed themselves in the best possible manner in order to produce something that aligns with the organisations culture and aspirations for its partners and customers.

It is a pleasure to have 33 Creative as extended members of our Jawun family”.

– Karyn Baylis

Find out more about Jawun, and join the journey

The brief

In 2021, Facebook, now Meta, established a partnership with Trading Blak, with the goal of helping Trading Blak businesses to utilise Facebook’s tools to assist their business. Meta came to 33 Creative with the goals to further support Indigenous small businesses through offering training in skills and tools to establish or grow their online presence.

The campaign had two phases. The first was a virtual training summit in partnership with Indigenous Business Month and live streamed on the Facebook for Business Facebook page. The agenda of this event was to include a panel of First Nations entrepreneurs sharing tips, tools, and tricks to create a successful business online. The second phase was a campaign to encourage all Australians to buy from Blak-owned business on the ecommerce day of the year, Black Friday. This also involved transforming the Black Friday sales event into #BuyBlak Friday.

The campaign called for the engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander influencers to create content driving awareness of the campaign. We completed extensive research into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Influencers, entrepreneurs, and public figures active on Instagram and Facebook and advocated for their participation in this campaign.

33 Creative facilitated the outreach of Indigenous influencers and managed the communication, briefing and development of content between the client and each influencer involved in both phase one and phase two. This involved researching and selecting suitable influencers with a platform that would best achieve the goals of the client. This resulted in a successful onboarding of 29 influencers including Bianca Hunt, Mitch Tambo, Casey Donovan and Rachael Sarra.

Each influencer provided creative content that engaged their audiences and raised awareness of the summit and the #BuyBlak Friday ecommerce event. We worked closely with Meta to provide creative guidance to each influencer ensuring their content was entertaining, engaging and/or informative.

33 Creative also produced the campaign’s broadcast suite, video content and social assets which supported all stages across the 8-week active campaign.

Influencer Campaign

The artwork

Talented Menang Gnudju Noongar artist, Kiya Watt created the artwork ‘Journey’ featuring her trademark style. The Yakan’s (Turtles) represents opportunity and growth travelling separately and eventually coming together to create the future. The circles show strength and power in their pathways taken and the different colours highlight the connection between them when separated. All symbols tie together beautifully showing the journey and steps it takes to get anywhere in life, every pathway matters and is needed to learn valuable lessons.

Kiya talks through the story behind her artwork:

“Because it was created for Indigenous Business Month it encapsulates the strength in Indigenous Business and everything that we do. I wanted to highlight the leadership it takes to go on our own path. As they are both Blak they strengthen each other, they support each other, but on their own individual pathway.”

“It shows the journey and the leadership to take separate paths and the strength that it takes in taking these separate paths into leadership. It also shows the circles here that show the ongoing cycles and inspiration it brings in taking these leaps into our own pathways.”

The outcome

Since the campaign was launched it has reach 6.2 million Australians and made over 9 million impressions. This is above the benchmark of 2-3 impressions to convert 1-2 for brand recall. There was a 5% measure of brand recall. The highest performing ad was the video with 6.2% brand recall.

The brief

33 Creative was delighted to join Jawun in helping celebrate their 20-year journey, acknowledging the achievements to date and setting the path for the next 20 years to come.

For more than 20 years, Jawun has been a place where corporate, government and philanthropic organisations come together with First Nations people to affect real change.

Starting in Cape York, partnerships are now in place in regions across the country, supporting communities on the ground through long term partnerships.

The program is proudly Indigenous-led, working with communities and corporate partners to deliver community benefits. While this is the driving purpose, there is also a practical reconciliation benefit to partners and secondees in their participation that contributes to a better nation.

Our strategic approach to thids project was motivated by the Jawun ethos of Indigenous-led empowerment, starting with the theme, ‘Our people, Our Future. Muruku’. ‘Muruku’ meaning ‘together’ in the traditional language of Kuku Yalanji people in Cape York.

In addition to the development of strategy, 33 Creative also produced a number of print materials which showcased the new look-and-feel for the 20th anniversary.

The Jawun partnership model has been revitalised with a prospectus and welcome pack to support new and existing friends of Jawun in the continued journey of partnership. Twenty years on, Jawun continues to grow, to find new friends and partners to continue walking the path communities have lit.

In the words of the Kuku Yalanji language, the home and birthplace of Jawun in Cape York, the story continues.

Our people. Our future. Muruku (together). 

The logo

The AIATSIS logo is derived from the boomerang totem of the Guunaani (Kunjen) people from the Mitchell River region, Gulf of Carpentaria, North Queensland. The design is painted on a softwood shield purchased in the 1930s by the late Miss Ursula McConnel while she was carrying out research at Yarrabah, near Cairns. The shield was one of four fighting shields collected at the same time made by Malcolm, Claude and George Wilson who were residents in Yarrabah at the time.

“Design is a tool, making a process, and art the narrative that connects us back to story and experience. Through my work I create and interpret in ways that can often transcend words and language, flowing from deep within my bones. Winangaylana ngay mara, my hands remember (their making continues)”

 

– Artist, Lucy Simpson

Good Design Awards

In 2021, we were thrilled to learn that the AIATSIS website redevelopment was recognised at the Australian Good Design Awards, receiving a Gold Accolade in the Digital Design category.

The project was a true collaboration of skills and expertise, reflecting and celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and knowledge through a contemporary platform which continues to make an impact among its audiences.

NASCA Communications Strategy

NASCA is a programs-based youth development organisation that empowers young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to be proud, strong and successful. For more than 25 years, NASCA have worked with over 12,000 young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Having undergone significant recent internal and external changes, NASCA engaged 33 Creative to assist them in reviewing their strategic communications activities across the organisation.

Our role in this project saw us utilise our expertise as an Aboriginal communications agency to facilitate workshops with key members of the NASCA national team. We conducted a full review of all communications activities and messaging to ensure these reflected the organisation’s overall strategy, growth and ability to adapt to the current social landscape.

This process involved 33 Creative developing a communications framework which provided clarity and conviction around who NASCA are at their core, what they do, why culture is such an integral part of the organisation, and what their brand application looks like going forward.

We recommended a new tagline, key priorities and looked at NASCA’s primary audience groups, segmenting their specific needs across messaging, products, and channels, to allow for a bespoke approach into audience reach and community engagement.

The framework developed serves as the beginning of a refined communications strategy which is in the initial stages of its rollout. We’re excited to see the new brand logo featuring the new tagline Culture, Education, Community!

The brief

33 Creative was delighted to join Jawun in helping celebrate their 20-year journey, acknowledging the achievements to date and setting the path for the next 20 years to come.

For more than 20 years, Jawun has been a place where corporate, government and philanthropic organisations come together with First Nations people to affect real change.

Starting in Cape York, partnerships are now in place in regions across the country, supporting communities on the ground through long term partnerships.

The program is proudly Indigenous-led, working with communities and corporate partners to deliver community benefits. While this is the driving purpose, there is also a practical reconciliation benefit to partners and secondees in their participation that contributes to a better nation.

Our strategic approach to thids project was motivated by the Jawun ethos of Indigenous-led empowerment, starting with the theme, ‘Our people, Our Future. Muruku’. ‘Muruku’ meaning ‘together’ in the traditional language of Kuku Yalanji people in Cape York.

In addition to the development of strategy, 33 Creative also produced a number of print materials which showcased the new look-and-feel for the 20th anniversary.

The materials

Our goal was to create a strength-based approach to empowering individuals, their families, and their communities in knowing they are not alone. To do this we created materials that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by eating disorders and body image issues could easily recognise and identify with.

The ‘Every BODY is Deadly campaign’ was launched with two key campaign ambassadors: Wiradjuri, Bundjulung, Kamilaroi and Yuin woman, Garigarra Mundine, and Kamilaroi and Dhungutti sister girl, Felicia Foxx, who shared their personal stories.

For Felicia Foxx, growing up in a male-dominated Aboriginal family that was very masculine and athletic had a significant impact on her body image and sexual identity. For years she struggled with expectations of how her body should look—until she realised it was just like her ancestors.

Back home with her family and surrounded by culture, Garra never took much notice of her body image. However, at the age of 11 after moving to Sydney, she began to feel her body was different and eventually developed an eating disorder.

Video Production

A major aspect of the communications campaign were videos produced specifically for social media platforms and audiences.

In the videos, Garra and Felicia talk openly about their personal journeys and body image related experiences.

The video shoot took place over the course of a single day in the inner-west Sydney suburb of Newtown, and also included a photoshoot with each talent.

We hired an indoor living space for interviews and interior shots, and acquired b-roll in surrounding suburban streets, as well as the iconic Carriageworks precinct (the former Eveleigh Railway Workshops).

Our crew on the day consisted of a videographer, producer, production assistant, and hair and makeup professional.

Pre-production work included location scouting and booking, the development of a videography brief, shot list, and run sheet for the day, the development of interview questions, and talent and crew booking.

The impact

The Every BODY is Deadly campaign is a first step, providing a platform for awareness and discussion about this issue.

The materials are available to download from the Butterfly Foundation website, to help support community health providers, schools, and staff to identify signs and symptoms of an eating disorder.

The vision for the campaign is to continue building out these personal stories, recognising and reflecting the diversity of communities and ensuring there is not one approach that suits everyone – eating disorders and body image issues can affect anyone, at any time.

Support is available for people at risk or experiencing an eating disorder by calling 1800 33 4673. You can also call the helpline if you are concerned about someone close to you or you can contact Butterfly Foundation by email or online chat.

The brief

33 Creative have a long working relationship with the NSW Centre for Aboriginal Health and a combined passion for improving the health and wellbeing of communities.

We were engaged by the NSW Government to support the rollout of communications and engagement throughout the COVID-19 pandemic crisis management and subsequent vaccine rollout. This is a project close to our hearts, helping to keep mob informed and protected.

The approach

Working with the Centre for Aboriginal Health, the Department of Customer Service, NSW Aboriginal Affairs and Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC), we contributed to the development and continual refinement of a communications strategy, including developing tailored resources to better support engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and stakeholders in NSW. We have worked flexibly with the Centre for Aboriginal Health throughout the pandemic, responding to ever changing situation.

A key priority of our approach was ensuring community voices were leading and elevated throughout the content, maximising reach and trust quickly.

We engaged community champions to share their experiences and encourage COVID safe behaviours throughout the campaign, ensuring health messages were delivered by trusted community leaders and health workers.

Community champion videos were highly effective in engaging community and formed an integral part of the campaign. Regular stakeholder toolkits and eDMs were also made available for stakeholders (including Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and Local Health Districts) to share locally.

We produced a number of TVCs, press, outdoor, digital, social and radio advertisements throughout the campaign to promote ways to help keep our mob safe.

We also produced a music video collaboration, with Mi-Kaisha and Nooky, to encourage youth social distancing at the early stages of the pandemic. The video clip was featured on The Project and boosted through NITV and other community channels, and was a finalist in the NSW Health Awards.

Mi-Kaisha

NAIDOC in the City

Since 2013, we have proudly worked with the City of Sydney to deliver its official NAIDOC Week event celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, cultures and achievements.

NAIDOC in the City is held in Hyde Park in the heart of Sydney’s bustling CBD and has grown to become one of the most unique gatherings and celebrations to occur in the city each year.

It holds a special place in our hearts given that we have produced this event alongside the City of Sydney since 2015. Prior to that, much of our team were responsible for producing the earlier NAIDOC in the City  events while working with the Deadly Vibe Group, including the inaugural event in 2013.

We are thrilled with the fact that after almost a decade of involvement and working to grow this event, NAIDOC in the City now regularly draws crowds of up to 10 000 people.

Festival activities include Aboriginal culture workshops, an arts and crafts and Indigenous goods marketplace, sports clinics including Indigenous games, traditional Aboriginal dance performances and workshops, food cooked in a traditional earth oven on site, live cooking demonstrations, and live music performances from Australia’s most talented Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander musicians.

Our work on NAIDOC in the City begins with developing the creative concept related to that years national NAIDOC theme. This involves ongoing discussions with the City of Sydney on how to best incorporate aspects related to that years theme into the festival program.

From there we can began to engage designers and artists to create that year’s event branding.

We have direct involvement with all copy writing for all materials, including flyers, posters, banners, and installations used at the event.

A huge part of the project is securing participants for the events knowledge and culture program, and managing the stalls marketplace, where a diverse range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses come to sell and showcase their products.

Essential to running a successful event each year is booking talent for the live music stage and arranging transport and accomadation.

Along the way, we develop and nurture strong relationships with a vast array of stakeholders, from community, to government to corporate organisations.

We provide marketing assistance to the City of Sydney, develop site signage, develop and produce promotional materials and event programs, manage sponsorship and budgets, and manage on site dignitaries, including Elders.

And of course, there’s all the fun on the day coordinating a bustling event with many moving parts and simultaneous activations, and making sure everything is running smoothly.

We pay our deep respects to the Gadigal peoples, the traditional owners of the lands upon which we have been privilege to stage this event, and also send out a warm acknowledgement to the City of Sydney for their support of First Nations cultural celebration and sharing.

The brief

33 Creative was delighted to join Jawun in helping celebrate their 20-year journey, acknowledging the achievements to date and setting the path for the next 20 years to come.

For more than 20 years, Jawun has been a place where corporate, government and philanthropic organisations come together with First Nations people to affect real change.

Starting in Cape York, partnerships are now in place in regions across the country, supporting communities on the ground through long term partnerships.

The program is proudly Indigenous-led, working with communities and corporate partners to deliver community benefits. While this is the driving purpose, there is also a practical reconciliation benefit to partners and secondees in their participation that contributes to a better nation.

Our strategic approach to thids project was motivated by the Jawun ethos of Indigenous-led empowerment, starting with the theme, ‘Our people, Our Future. Muruku’. ‘Muruku’ meaning ‘together’ in the traditional language of Kuku Yalanji people in Cape York.

In addition to the development of strategy, 33 Creative also produced a number of print materials which showcased the new look-and-feel for the 20th anniversary.

The impact

SWSB members adapted – as strong women in business do – to the new challenges brought about by COVID-19. The online SWSB Facebook group grew vastly into a flourishing interactive hub for likeminded women to support each other in life and in business through unprecedented times. The first half of 2021 saw the existing SWSB Facebook membership grow by 22 percent.

As part of the overall strategy, we worked with the SWSB team to analyse recurring themes and universal experiences SWSB members were contending with in the current COVID landscape, building this into the strategy.  A key deliverable was the development of SWSB’s first ever regular newsletter.

Now at 1,160 subscribers and growing strong, the newsletter provides another medium to tell stories and unite the SWSB community through rich, focused and user-generated content. Moreover, the ‘Women in Business’ section of the newsletter has consistently been one of the top four performing click links of each newsletter edition so far.

Other deliverables included the successful implementation of a social media risk management and moderation response guide, as well as the establishment of the SWSB Instagram community which is currently at 1.2K members and steadily growing.

Re-strategising and building on SWSB’s online community also meant that conversations and opportunities to network were made more accessible to Indigenous women in business in regional and remote areas – a key focus for SWSB.

Gandangara Local Aboriginal Land Council

In 2022 and 2023, we were commissioned by Gandangara Local Aboriginal Land Council to produce a video that promoted the holistic benefits of Yarning Circles.

Gandangara honours the Yarning Circle as a culturally safe practice with wide-ranging benefits for all peoples and organisations.

We shot the video over two days across three locations in Western Sydney. The voice over was recorded in a studio in Surry Hills, Sydney.

Our production team were centrally involved in all aspects of the project, including concept development, logistics, shoot and edit.

The Coalition of Peaks video series

In 2022 and 2023, 33 Creative partnered with the Coalition of Peaks to produce a series of videos that communicate different aspects related to the work the Coalition of Peaks has been doing with Australian governments to close the health and education gaps that exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

The Coalition of Peaks are made up of over 80 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled peak and member organisations across Australia who came together as an act of self-determination to work together with Australian governments on Closing the Gap.

Our team filmed several interviews with Coalition of Peaks members at two gatherings held in Melbourne and Sydney, and were centrally involved in the strategy, planning and coordination of the video series.