Author: Laura La Rosa

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

Scarf created by Gunnai, Gunditjmara, and Yorta Yorta fashion designer, Lyn-Al Young

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

We also delivered their first public call for applicants to the program, working with First Nations media across Australia and New Zealand to reach community members through a series of editorial case studies that supported the digital advertising executions; this in turn drove people to the website and helped to elevate their overall presence ahead of building on the growing network of Fellows.

AFSE is several years in operation and continues to go from strength to strength. We are proud to have played such an important role in helping to develop and establish the brand and platforms for communicating what is truly an amazing initiative.

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

Global creative transformation company WPP approached 33 Creative to assist with producing their reconciliation action plan (RAP). Our role was to project manage the process, including engaging a First Nations artist for the project as well as design the RAP booklet ahead of its roll out.

In addition to project management, our biggest value-add as an Aboriginal agency, was in our knowledge sharing and facilitating guidance that helped WPP shape and appropriately communicate and commit to their reconciliation plan through engaging, informative, and accountability-led collateral.

The Artwork

33 Creative worked closely with Aboriginal artist Jordan Ardler who created WPP’s RAP artwork which is featured throughout the booklet.

Connected depicts a stunning and vibrant map of “the coastline pre-colonisation, with the waters between connecting the lands”, as explained in the RAP.

“The main meeting place icons represent WPP’s multiple offices in Australia, and reflect the close connection to our offices and colleagues in New Zealand. They are all connected by the walking track, symbolising strength and togetherness. The lime green patches seen splashing off the meeting places highlight the inspiration, power and creativity generated during collaboration.”

Jordan used her own fingerprints in the artwork to highlight her personal connection to Cadigal land of which WPP’s head office is located on.

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

IBM 2021 Award Winners

Inaugural Regional Indigenous Business Award Winner: Murri’s on the Move Ltd

Transferring safe driving skills and education to Indigenous youth and disadvantaged sectors of the community at a subsidised cost.

I2I Award Winner: Jessie Lloyd Music Pty Ltd

Connecting Indigenous women musicians or Songwomen into the professional arts industry and opportunities.

Indigenous Digital Inventiveness Award: BuyingBlack, Jetzak Pty Ltd

An online portal for the Indigenous Business Sector, their supporters and customers, helping businesses enter the digital marketplace.

Indigenous Ingenuity Award: Pipeline Talent Pty Ltd

Ingeniously establishing itself to act as a corporate vehicle to address the social issue of executive employment of Indigenous Australians.

PwC Australia partnered with the MURRA Indigenous Business Program Master Class Program to lead their dedicated award category, the PwC Murra Boost Initiative, whereby the winner is paired with specialist skills and expertise of PwC Australia to the value of $30,000, to support a specific part of their business growth.

This year the PwC Murra Boost Initiative was Cedrent Enterprises, a vehicle hire company working across a number of communities but continuing to grow with increasing market demand.

33 Creative worked with our designers and social media strategists along with agency, Iscariot Media, to produce resources to support individuals and businesses to engage with Indigenous Business Month. The result was online engagement with Indigenous Business Month platforms that doubled during and in the lead up to October.  Everyone is really getting behind #IndigBizMonth and we were excited to spur the movement with design assets that allowed for allies to share their support amongst their networks, helping to promote Indigenous businesses to thrive and address the needs of our communities.

Media

33 Creative also facilitated numerous media interviews with Indigenous Business Month co-founders, as well as a number of individual Indigenous Businesses on platforms such as SBS/NITV, National Indigenous Radio Service, Welcome to Country and other broadcasters who continue to have a strong interest in sharing the good news stories during Indigenous Business Month.

The interest from media outlets continues to grow, with special mention to SBS NITV for their Indigenous business segment focus this year, as well as National Indigenous Radio and other outlets such as Torres Strait Islander Media Association who are all helping to fuel the conversations about the significance of powering the Indigenous economy.

The brief

In 2021, Facebook, now Meta, established a partnership with Trading Blak, with the goal of helping Trading Blak businesses to utilise Facebook’s tools to assist their business. Meta came to 33 Creative with the goals to further support Indigenous small businesses through offering training in skills and tools to establish or grow their online presence.

The campaign had two phases. The first was a virtual training summit in partnership with Indigenous Business Month and live streamed on the Facebook for Business Facebook page. The agenda of this event was to include a panel of First Nations entrepreneurs sharing tips, tools, and tricks to create a successful business online. The second phase was a campaign to encourage all Australians to buy from Blak-owned business on the ecommerce day of the year, Black Friday. This also involved transforming the Black Friday sales event into #BuyBlak Friday.

The campaign called for the engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander influencers to create content driving awareness of the campaign. We completed extensive research into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Influencers, entrepreneurs, and public figures active on Instagram and Facebook and advocated for their participation in this campaign.

33 Creative facilitated the outreach of Indigenous influencers and managed the communication, briefing and development of content between the client and each influencer involved in both phase one and phase two. This involved researching and selecting suitable influencers with a platform that would best achieve the goals of the client. This resulted in a successful onboarding of 29 influencers including Bianca Hunt, Mitch Tambo, Casey Donovan and Rachael Sarra.

Each influencer provided creative content that engaged their audiences and raised awareness of the summit and the #BuyBlak Friday ecommerce event. We worked closely with Meta to provide creative guidance to each influencer ensuring their content was entertaining, engaging and/or informative.

33 Creative also produced the campaign’s broadcast suite, video content and social assets which supported all stages across the 8-week active campaign.

The artwork

Talented Menang Gnudju Noongar artist, Kiya Watt created the artwork ‘Journey’ featuring her trademark style. The Yakan’s (Turtles) represents opportunity and growth travelling separately and eventually coming together to create the future. The circles show strength and power in their pathways taken and the different colours highlight the connection between them when separated. All symbols tie together beautifully showing the journey and steps it takes to get anywhere in life, every pathway matters and is needed to learn valuable lessons.

The brief

NAISDA Dance College, Australia’s leading dance and performing arts training organisation specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, has been instrumental in the skills development and empowerment of Indigenous dancers, choreographers, artists and artworkers in the performing arts since 1976. NAISDA approached 33 Creative to assist with developing their auditions campaign.

The goal was to foreground NAISDA’s viability as a performing arts training college and pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancers and performers, against the backdrop of the second year of lockdowns and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included pivoting from onsite to online auditions, which meant we needed to redirect the narrative and messaging of the college.

For this campaign we collaborated across three creative agencies to bring the NAISDA vision to life. We’d like to acknowledge eOne and Brillant Logic as key partners in the collaboration for this campaign, who were also engaged by NAISDA.

The outcome

Since the campaign was launched it has reach 6.2 million Australians and made over 9 million impressions. This is above the benchmark of 2-3 impressions to convert 1-2 for brand recall. There was a 5% measure of brand recall. The highest performing ad was the video with 6.2% brand recall.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

The brief

In 2021, Facebook, now Meta, established a partnership with Trading Blak, with the goal of helping Trading Blak businesses to utilise Facebook’s tools to assist their business. Meta came to 33 Creative with the goals to further support Indigenous small businesses through offering training in skills and tools to establish or grow their online presence.

The campaign had two phases. The first was a virtual training summit in partnership with Indigenous Business Month and live streamed on the Facebook for Business Facebook page. The agenda of this event was to include a panel of First Nations entrepreneurs sharing tips, tools, and tricks to create a successful business online. The second phase was a campaign to encourage all Australians to buy from Blak-owned business on the ecommerce day of the year, Black Friday. This also involved transforming the Black Friday sales event into #BuyBlak Friday.

The campaign called for the engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander influencers to create content driving awareness of the campaign. We completed extensive research into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Influencers, entrepreneurs, and public figures active on Instagram and Facebook and advocated for their participation in this campaign.

The artwork

Talented Menang Gnudju Noongar artist, Kiya Watt created the artwork ‘Journey’ featuring her trademark style. The Yakan’s (Turtles) represents opportunity and growth travelling separately and eventually coming together to create the future. The circles show strength and power in their pathways taken and the different colours highlight the connection between them when separated. All symbols tie together beautifully showing the journey and steps it takes to get anywhere in life, every pathway matters and is needed to learn valuable lessons.

The brief

In 2021, Hearing Australia engaged us to help develop materials and drive media engagement as part of their national HAPEE program (Hearing Assessment – Early Ears).

With 1 in 3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids affected by serious ear and hearing troubles, HAPEE promotes awareness around early detection and hearing loss prevention through offering free diagnostic assessments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who have not yet reached school age.

Our role was to develop a comprehensive range of materials to help with the program delivery on the ground. We also created the campaign’s tagline, ‘HAPEE Ears for Early Years’ featured throughout the materials.

As part of the program, HAPEE aims to upskill and support primary care providers, early education staff, and parents and carers with the ability to identify, manage and monitor potential hearing loss in young children. It was essential that these materials were engaging, useful, and spoke to stakeholders, parents and carers at a community level.

As part of the materials roll out and the program’s media and advertising output, we engaged ambassadors, Wiradjuri man, Luke Carroll (Actor and Playschool Presenter), and Gumbaynggirr, Dhungatti, Yamatji and Bibbulman woman, Emma Donovan (Musician), to draw on their lived experiences as parents and bring wider media and community attention to the topic of hearing loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids.

We developed a range of information materials and resources to support the ABS community field officers in their community outreach and stakeholder engagement activities. This included a conversation guide, stakeholder toolkit, and a suite of case studies developed in partnership with community organisations that tell the story of how Census data has benefited local programs and services.

We also developed print, radio, digital, social and out of home advertising placement, prioritising Indigenous media outlets. Media partnerships were developed to enable new and innovative ways to distribute the resources to as many communities as possible.

The materials were visually engaging, applying the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander branding for the ABS, which centred around artwork developed by Aboriginal artist Luke Penrith and Torres Strait Islander artist Naseli Tamwoy. The resulting combined artwork tells the story of cultural connection to land and sea, sharing knowledge and data to improve the wellbeing of communities.

The brand was used across all materials, bringing a highly visual approach to delivering the Census information that supports community connection and storytelling.

Feedback from stakeholders was that the materials were very appealing and effective in engaging communities. Results from the campaign evaluation sample indicated high recognition and cut through of the assets to encourage Census participation.

Amber McNaughton

Event and Project Manager

Amber McNaughton is an events manager with fifteen years of industry experience. She has a breadth of experience in stage management. Amber has a Diploma in Journalism and a passion for live events, organisational management and working with creative people.